#1
I've realized that there are probably millions of these, and I have looked through a bunch of pages but my questions haven't really been answered.

1. Whats the difference in recording between line in and microphone?
2. If I were to buy a 1/4 -1/8 adaptor and have my guitar run through my amp, and have it go out into my input on my computer would I get good quality?
3. and if number two is no, what is a better alternative other than microphone?

EDIT:: 4. If I were to get it working, how would I record it and add effects?
#2
answers
1, with line in, you plug directly into the computer, terrible quality, buzzes and disorts (not the good kind either)
2, it could possible fry the sound card on your computer and still sound like crap...
3, buy a 1/4-USB adapter (about $60)
but its alot cheaper to use a mic
that cover everything?
UG's HIPPIE
#3
and number 4: you could download Audiacity (find it on google) use that to record and then download Goldwave and use that for (better) effects and quality....audiacity has effects, but they arent that great and are not editable..goldwave is complicated but has EVERYTHING you need
UG's HIPPIE
#4
So could you link me to a good usb adaptor? I mean i've looked at pod, stealthplug and all of these, but I have no idea which one is good.
#5
go to musicgoround.com
type in usb in the search...find it in a city near you....if they dont have it tell me and i can find one elsewhere...
UG's HIPPIE
#7
no, theres nothing there in my area.
I'm kinda looking to have bundeled software with it too. if that helps
#8
Microphone input is designed for mics and headsets for gaming/chatting/ect. if your going to record stuff directly, use line in. If you have some decent recording software you can get moderate quality from direct recording. If your just messing around its perfect, no need to by recording hardware. But if you want maximum recording quality, buy a mixer. Alesis makes quality mixers for entry level recording and beyond that. My friend bought an aleisis multimix8 usb 8 channel mixer for 140.00 dollars. It is very effective if you know how to use it. (i say if you know how to use it because when he first used it he ran his guitar pedal to the mixer to record, cranked the master on the mixer up to 10 and expected the recorded sound to be good. Obviously he didn't have a clue that you have to balance the sound levels correctly )

oh i almost forgot the alesis multimix 8 came bundled with Cubase LE, VERY good recording software
#10
Quote by viginti_tres
Microphone input is designed for mics and headsets for gaming/chatting/ect. if your going to record stuff directly, use line in. If you have some decent recording software you can get moderate quality from direct recording. If your just messing around its perfect, no need to by recording hardware. But if you want maximum recording quality, buy a mixer. Alesis makes quality mixers for entry level recording and beyond that. My friend bought an aleisis multimix8 usb 8 channel mixer for 140.00 dollars. It is very effective if you know how to use it. (i say if you know how to use it because when he first used it he ran his guitar pedal to the mixer to record, cranked the master on the mixer up to 10 and expected the recorded sound to be good. Obviously he didn't have a clue that you have to balance the sound levels correctly )

oh i almost forgot the alesis multimix 8 came bundled with Cubase LE, VERY good recording software


OMG
That is what i'm looking for, so are you telling me I can input my guitar to that, and export it from that device to my computer and record and stuff via USB?
#11
Contrary to many opinions, you can get quite good quality on line in of your computer (very little noise) for little to no money. If you check my link, I have real examples of it. But you can't connect your guitar directly. Normally use your amps low power headphone output via a stereo cable to the PC LINE IN. You can use audicity SW. To get started this is cheap. You might decide you suck at mixing/recording as it can be somewhat technical. You could be a great guitar player and still suck at this.

I have a USB device now and to be honest I can perceive very little difference in recording quality compared to my line INPUT and the digital (USB, etc) is more tempermental (geek wise). Its not a professional studio, but its pretty dang good.
#12
mkay. thats probably what I'll do, is run my guitar into my amp, then out through the headphones jack into the Line in. Correct?
And is there any fear of killing my sound card?
#13
Ok, dude, I don't know why nobody is telling you this, but there is no way to really know if it will sound good or not. Here's why: Your amp is designed to amplify the signal to a level necessary to move your speaker cones and make sound. When you skip the speakers and send that signal to your soundcard it will usually sound crappy. Because the signal is designed for a speaker cabinet, not another circuit full of gizmos.

A few years ago I would have said no way, no how, it will sound like crap. But, since we have modelers, conditioned outputs and so forth, some of this has changed. I've heard some amps sound awesome going direct. I've heard a mesa sound like total shit going direct. It just depends on how the amp circuit is built.

So, skip all that USB crap. Waste of money and precious time. Go into your line in of your soundcard, just like you said and just see what it sounds like. Clean channels always sound pretty decent. It's the distortion that's going to be the problem. If you like it - cool. If it sucks, then buy a little DI box for about 30 bucks and it will simulate a cabinet and sound kick ass.

Yes there is fear of killing your soundcard using your headphones out. But you'd have to turn up pretty high to do it. Your signal will clip before then, so you wouldn't do that anyway.

Try Audacity just long enough to see how it all sounds. When you get it figured out how you want it, go buy a real sequencer for crying out loud. I've seen people waste so much freaking time trying to use free shit everywhere. Free audio programs suck. A real sequencer has tools, effects, features you don't even know you need. Sure you can download a dozen free goodies and run them all in different windows and constantly close the pop-ups and half assed effects and programs - or you can get one, good sequencer that will do everything and a hundred other things you didn't think of - and it will do it all better.