#1
Most websites about playing postion seem to say the same thing:
The best postition for playing classical & acoustic guitar is the classical position, with the guitar on your left leg and a footstool under your left foot.

The strange thing it that most guitarist these days rest their guitar on their right leg, and don't use any footstools and such. So does anyone know how essential the classical position really is for playing tension-free? Does playing with your guitar on the right leg have any long-term disadvantages, or is it just as good as the classical position as long as you follow certain guidelines?
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#2
The classical position is certainly far more effective for playing efficiently and reducing tension; however, your average guitarist doesn't play pieces of the complexity and dexterity that not playing in classical position would detrimental too

basically do whats comfortable unless something hurts when you do that
#3
I've never seen a video of someone playing a difficult rock or metal song with their guitar on their right leg, except when someone is playing a V-shaped guitar sitting down. You have to play it classical style because it will just slip off your leg if you don't.

I've also only seen classical guitar music played in the classical position, with the guitar on the left leg. I think this is probably necessary for a lot of the hand positions one must take in classical playing.

Personally, I play all guitars in all styles (I kind of do everything) in the classical position - this is mostly due to me playing a Flying V, and having to do this out of necessity. While this appears to not be required for rock/metal playing (there are millions of videos of skilled players proving this), I find it to be more comfortable. People also say that it more closely simulates the position of playing while standing up, which is a difficult transition for most.

If you really want to pick one of the two, I would choose the classical style - but it's up to you.
#4
I'm seriously thinking about switching to the classical position 'cause I'm a bit worried about the tension I sometimes get in my right shoulder. When playing in classical position it seems to be much less. Anyone know how to tell if your footstool has the proper hight?
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#5
^^
A footstool dosnt need to be high, just enough so that ur comfortable and so that you dont get a cramp in ur leg or foot.

Ive Always played in classical style feels to weird doing it "the other way"
#6
You can get guitar footstools at a shop for around ten bucks, and they're adjustable. Pick one up, and just play with the height of it until you're comfortable; I would guess that it would depend on how tall you are, how high your chair is, etc.
I got one recently, and it's improved my playing already...makes everyhting so much more comfortable.
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#7
Quote by Dardarian
Most websites about playing postion seem to say the same thing:
The best postition for playing classical & acoustic guitar is the classical position, with the guitar on your left leg and a footstool under your left foot.

The strange thing it that most guitarist these days rest their guitar on their right leg, and don't use any footstools and such. So does anyone know how essential the classical position really is for playing tension-free? Does playing with your guitar on the right leg have any long-term disadvantages, or is it just as good as the classical position as long as you follow certain guidelines?


Classical isn't the only good position, but it's certainly the best. There's nothing wrong with the casual position. It does tend to be more comfortable and relaxed for most people, which is generally why that's what you always see.

Classical however does have advantages. The angle and position of the neck tends to improve your hand position so you have greater reach with less strain on your hand. It tends to be uncomfortable until you're really used to it, which is generally why people just stick with casual. Personally, I think it's worth the initial discomfort as the switch has done my playing a world of good. It is rather annoying at times to have to find something to prop my foot up on though, leading to impromptu stacks of random objects when I don't have my footstool around.
#8
I normally play over my right knee but often with my right leg resting on my left.

One thing I would say about classical technique is with respect to the left hand position, especially thumb and angle of attack of the fingers. Also left wrist. A little attention to, and copying of, these features will aid more accurate and faster technique and help avoid strain and eventual injury.
#9
Quote by Dave Keir
I normally play over my right knee but often with my right leg resting on my left.


I've done this a lot too. It seems to reduce the tenstion in my right shoulder almost as good as the classical position, but because of the fact that my right leg is over my left leg the lower part of my right leg seems to get a bit of an interupted blood flow 'causing it to tingle and get numb sometimes (believe it's called a sleeping leg, although I don't know if that's the correct english word)
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#10
Hi,
I am also trying to figure out the height of my footstool while playing classical guitar. I have been using the third notch of my footstool (about 7 inches from ground), and my left hand wrist hurts after I finished playing for an hour. I have tried using the fourth notch (about 8 inches from ground), and I start to feel tension on my left arm bicep. I am 5'7" tall. Any suggestions?
Last edited by xiaryx at Aug 23, 2007,
#11
You have to play it classical style because it will just slip off your leg if you don't.


Um... what? How the hell would your guitar slip off your leg?

Just do what's comfortable if you're playing for the sake of playing (which it seems for you, is classical position anyway). If you're planning on competing or trying to create a career out of playing, then I'd go with classical because it does have some definate benefits.

Oh and personally anytime I play classical, I just rest my right foot on its side underneath the left (if you don't get it i'll upload a picture) and it gives my leg plenty of lift. It's a handy way of doing it with no stool around.
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Last edited by 3holepunch at Aug 23, 2007,
#12
I learn by myself without anybody help, so I started with alternative position. Then I found out about classical possition and I tired it out. It was so uncommfortable at first. But I didn't gave up. And now I really feel the difference. The classical position is so much better. I think it's best to learn both positions, because some of the songs is easier to play in alternative position.