#1
Okay so im about to go and take lessons again but im always hearing about how the bands i listen to were self taght on guitar. so what do you think? is in worth 20 bucks for every lesson or should i just keep teaching myself. And if tom hess is about to reply to this please, i beg you please, use small words i can understand.
SubJunKtiVe
#2
well I am a first time guitar player and I started with guitar lessons.. It definately helps in my eyes, I couldn't do anything before now I am starting to be able to play one of my fav songs, it's up to you though.. I pay about the same amount
#3
Lessons are good. Ive never had any but Id say theyre good as long as there is something you want to know or learn. Loads of famous people are self taught but loads are taught as well. I think you need a mix of both - lessons for technique and you're own learning to get you're "sound" and "style"
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#4
Depends on where you want to go with your guitar playing.

I am self taught, but I am not a great guitar player. I am only now getting into things like scales and improvisation, it's coming slow, probably would have been faster have I had taken lessons, BUT, I only play acoustic as a hobby and for some good 'ol campfire sing-a-longs!

If you play lead electric, you might want to consider lessons if you want to advance faster, however, some people becoming great without lessons, it all comes down to you (^^ see post above).
#5
A combination of lessons and learning yourself would be an optimal fit. A teacher can show you different tricks and techniques much quicker than what you've picked up on your own. A teacher is also great for any questions you'd have, because in general, they're very knowledgable. With that being said, a major part to improving on any instrument is exploring it yourself. Just by playing it with a trial and error method, you'll find out what sounds good, and what sounds right. You might uncover something that sounds amazing through mistake.
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#6
I have been playing for about 1 and a half years now. I am self-taught, and i think I pretty much suck. I have been coming along okay, and now I have not shown any progress in the past month or so. I recieved a raise at my job (an extra $120 a month) so I figured I will take some of that and get lessons. I have seen some players that I thought were great get even better at the instrument after lessons. I assume it is not for all, but I can not be sure until I go and get them.
#7
Quote by xTJx
A combination of lessons and learning yourself would be an optimal fit. A teacher can show you different tricks and techniques much quicker than what you've picked up on your own. A teacher is also great for any questions you'd have, because in general, they're very knowledgable. With that being said, a major part to improving on any instrument is exploring it yourself. Just by playing it with a trial and error method, you'll find out what sounds good, and what sounds right. You might uncover something that sounds amazing through mistake.


+1

If you can afford lessons, get them.
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#9
I would say sign up for a few lessons, and see how the teacher is, and ask him if he can teach you what you want to learn. If you like them and you're getting something out of them, then by all means take them!

But also keep continuing to teach yourself stuff. If there's something that you can teach yourself, and you want to spend class time on something that you really need help with, learn it by yourself so you can spend as much time in class working on the thing you need help with.
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