#1
Ok, here's the deal. I recently bought the MXL 990/991 mic set. The mics work fine, I use the 991 for recording my amp, and the 990 for recording vocals. Only thing is, when I'm recording the electric guitar and the vocals at the same time, the 990 picks up the sound created by the strumming of the electric guitar strings. It sounds kind of weird to have the sound from the amp along with the other noise, it kind of dilutes the quality of the recording. Is there any way to prevent this from happening? I haven't got a pop filter or anything yet, so would something like that help me? Also, I'm using an Alesis Multimix 8 mixer, if that makes any difference at all.

I hope I made the question clear enough.

Cheers!
#3
And why do you want to record them at the same time? Electric guitar and vocals? Is this using distortion? Interesting...but odd. How are you adding percussion?

I'm wondering why you care so much about the quality when you're not using a recording method that suggests quality at all.

This is why multi tracking was invented. It allows you to capture the sound of each individual instrument without the natural noise that comes with playing other instruments at the same time.
#4
Also I might suggest using a dynamic, like an SM58 on the vocals as oppose to a condenser when you're recording like that thats the advantage of dynamics, condensers are very sensitive and pick up a lot of everything. An omni direction Dynamic would be even better.
#5
Well, I've never actually tried multi tracking, mostly because I was afraid I'd get messed up and lose my place without having the vocals going on at the same time as the guitar, but perhaps I'll give it a shot. I'm still refining my recording method, and I am by no means an expert(obviously). I didn't say my method was quality, I'm just trying to make recordings that don't suck, that's all.
#6
well if they dont suck, i guess they would have good quality... just try multitracking.. its not like everythign will go down teh drain if u mess up... just start again.. its jsut a songs length... only a few minutes, if your really devoted to your music you will take the time needed to make a good quality song
Do you, you, feel like I do?
#7
Quote by houseofllama
Well, I've never actually tried multi tracking, mostly because I was afraid I'd get messed up and lose my place without having the vocals going on at the same time as the guitar, but perhaps I'll give it a shot. I'm still refining my recording method, and I am by no means an expert(obviously). I didn't say my method was quality, I'm just trying to make recordings that don't suck, that's all.


Ok, cool, I get where you're coming from. I don't think you'll get messed up if you have any sense of timing without strumming your guitar. A metronome will be your friend here. You can make it as loud as you want, change the beats per measure...etc. I would definitely not do vocals at the same time. Record each instrument, including your voice, separately. It will sound so much better because you can tweak the settings on your gate, compressor, signal chain for the best sound with least noise.

Also try layering your guitar parts. Match them exactly or alter the part a little bit on each track, to give them depth and width. It strengthens the root note for the listener and makes your vocals sound better. Singing sounds better with an instrument to reference key, enhancing the melody, so the fatter and fuller you can make the bass and mids, the better the vocals sound.
#8
There are a few issues that need to be dealt with here.

I'm wondering why you care so much about the quality when you're not using a recording method that suggests quality at all.

This is why multi tracking was invented. It allows you to capture the sound of each individual instrument without the natural noise that comes with playing other instruments at the same time.


Sound quality doesn't increase just because you overdub everything. The reason we overdub is because it's easier to focus on one particular instrument to get the best takes possible. It's often not practical to use 15 guitar amps at the same time as recording drums, even though this does happen from time to time in the big boy studios.

Some of the best sounding records of all time were tracked live with instruments bleeding into each other. I remember my first live recording turned out great. Hearing the guitar amp in the drums was great because it made the guitar sound huge...it had a space that I had never achieved before. It was a very "ear opening" experience.


Now if you this kid is having problems with guitar strings getting into his vocal mic, there are a few options.
#1 Live with it.
#2 Move the mic and your head into an uncomfortable position (not recommended)
#3 Strum lighter
#4 Overdub

Most of the time, I do like to overdub vocals. While I've done a few records where the live vocals were unbeatable, most of the time, I like to be able to produce the vocals and really kick the singer in the ass when needed.

Brandon