#1
Where can I get a list of scales and such that I can learn?

I know the Minor Pentatonic Scale, which should be:

A Pentatonic Minor Scale

E--5--8---------------------------------
A--------5--7--------------------------
D-------------5--7---------------------
G-------------------5--7----------------
B------------------------5--8-----------
E------------------------------5--8-----

Does anyone have a list or a website or even in Guitar Pro 5 a place that I can gather more from to learn?

This would make a great sticky if someone could do that aswell!!

Thanks!
#2
not to be a dickhead, but im sure there is a sticky already somewhere....but check out this site...there are some cool exotic scales and stuff here www.worldguitar.com or check out UG's lessons, http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/scales/
Gear:
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser w/ EMG 81-85 Humbuckers
Peavey 6505+
Mesa/Boogie Rectifier 4x12 Slant Cab w/Vintage 30's
BBE Sonic Stomp
Boss TU-2
Boss NS-2
Boss DD-7
Danelectro Fish N' Chips EQ
#3
I checked that out, but the site just has a scale generator and I cannot manage to read this. Could someone direct me in the proper place to find the stickey or a list?
#4
Guitar pro:
Tools>scales...
And about Am pentatonic:
E--5--8---------------------------------
A--------5--7--------------------------
D-------------5--7---------------------
G-------------------5--7----------------
B------------------------5--8-----------
E------------------------------5--8-----

You mean:
E||--------------------------|--------5--8--||
B||--------------------------|--5--8--------||
G||--------------------5--7--|--------------||
D||--------------5--7--------|--------------||
A||--------5--7--------------|--------------||
E||--5--8--------------------|--------------||
#5
Yes, sorry.

Also. I checked Guitar Pro but I click on it and it won't show up anywhere for me to view... More details please.
#6
Tool>scales>scale finder>scan from bar:1(exp)to ...>find
Every possible scales can be shown.
#8
That is a visual representation of the fretboard. The thickest looking string is low E and the thinnest is high e. The notes in the scale are placed on the frets at which they are located.

In other words, it's like tab, but instead of telling you the fret number, it puts a dot at that fret.
#9
I understand the basic concepts. Perhaps I worded my question wrong.

Where is the start of each scale on the fretboard and where is the end?

Starting at each "A" and ending at each "G" ?

Example: The fith fret. Starts A on bottom E to C. D to E on A string. Now G on your D string. Is this the end? How do I differ them, seperate them, or basically any DOT on the fretboard would sound good as long as I'm playing A C D E G or within that? I'm lost.

Edit: Also how would I refine it to show just the one portion?

Example: Just:

E||--------------------------|--------5--8--||
B||--------------------------|--5--8--------||
G||--------------------5--7--|--------------||
D||--------------5--7--------|--------------||
A||--------5--7--------------|--------------||
E||--5--8--------------------|--------------||
#10
Quote by DimebagDaner
Where is the start of each scale on the fretboard and where is the end?
A scale is simply a group of notes. A scale is not a position on the fretboard. On that diagram, you have the entire Am pent written out everywhere it can be played on the guitar.


Quote by DimebagDaner
Edit: Also how would I refine it to show just the one portion?
That diagram is not very good for determining small little scale boxes. For that, I suggest using something like the scale-finder over at wholenote.com. You will find it under basics.
#11
Ok... That just confised me even more.

Where do you start to play Am Pent. on the guitar... What??
#12
Quote by DimebagDaner
Where do you start to play Am Pent. on the guitar
Honestly, you can start it anywhere. The most common way to play it is the way you tabbed it out, but any fingering that contains A C D E G is an acceptable way to play the scale.
#13
Alright... So anything played A C D E G (in any order) is from the Am Pentatonic Scale?

I'm still a little lost.
#15
The Am Pentatonic scale is anything played (full?) that contains A C D E G?

So if I'm playing chords and I play A C D E G cords I am playing the Am Pentatonic scale?

Also If I am playing a song that is played A G E, is this from the Am Pentatonic scale?

Just want to know how a scale is formed, what makes it that specific scale and how it differs from other?
#16
Quote by DimebagDaner
The Am Pentatonic scale is anything played (full?) that contains A C D E G?
As long as it contains only those notes and has the root as A (not necessarily starting on A, but the resolution should be A), the scale is Am pent.

Quote by DimebagDaner
So if I'm playing chords and I play A C D E G cords I am playing the Am Pentatonic scale?
Not quite. Those notes work, but as triad chords (A major, C major...), they do not fit in the Am pent.

Quote by DimebagDaner
Also If I am playing a song that is played A G E, is this from the Am Pentatonic scale?
Again, the chords contain notes that are not in the scale. For instance, the A chord contains a C#, which is not in the Am pent scale.

Quote by DimebagDaner
Just want to know how a scale is formed, what makes it that specific scale and how it differs from other?
A scale is formed by assigning a note as the root and then playing various intervals. For instance, the Am pent is formed by assigning A as the root and then playing a minor third (C), and fourth (D), a fifth (E), and a flat seventh (G). The intervals are often written like this: 1 b3 4 5 b7

Scales are different when the intervals are different. The Am pent, 1 b3 4 5 b7, is clearly different than the A major pent, 1 2 3 5 6.