#1
Hi guys,

I've been playing guitar for a short whiles now, about three years, and I just bought my first amp, a Vox AD50VT, about a month ago. It suits most of my needs and does pretty much all that I ask of it, well, at least it sounds a damn lot better than my guitar plugged into my stereo set through about a million different adaptor pieces.

Anyhow, the only problem with my amp is that it buzzes. I've heard lots of stories about buzzing amps, and some of them can get a little crazy, so I haven't been able to find a solution as to how I can fix my amp's little whining fits.

The specifics work like this. In my house, my amp is close to absolutely silent when I'm not playing. Its a beauty, it booms when I need it (not often, given that I live in an apartment with annoying neighbours) and the rest of the time its quiet. Now the problem is, when I take it with me to practice, it buzzes really badly, so badly that my bandmates get irritable whenever we're playing a slow section or not playing because the buzzing is the loudest thing besides our distortion. I'm convinced that this must be because of the power supply, because its the same amp with the same guitar with the same distortion pedal.

Now here's something else. If I use a different amp at the practice place with my distortion pedal, it again buzzes like crazy. This is insane and illogical, it could just be my stupid distortion pedal (one of those Boss stompboxes), or it could be something else.

My question is, how likely is it to be the power somehow, and how likely is it to be just the fact that in the practice room there are a lot of leads going all over the place in close proximity? An additional little piece of information is that I live in a country with 220V as the standard power voltage, if that makes any difference at all.

Thanks a lot guys, I'm sure somebody must know something about this sort of thing.
#2
it could be your guitar, especially if you have single coils. when you are at your band practice, there may be a lotof magnetic interference, hence the buzzing. if your band mates have a guitar with humbuckers try that through your amp
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#3
play without the pedal and if that doesnt sort it, get a new lead.

not sure about the power supply problem however
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#4
Ok, I'll try my friends guitar to see if that helps, I'm pretty sure he has a humbucker and I know I don't have one. How far would we have to be apart for the interference to subside?

Concerning the lead and pedal possibility, well, like I said, when I use exactly the same equipment at home, there is no problem, so I highly doubt its that.

Thanks guys though, gives me some ideas.
#5
Quote by prezpoonly
Ok, I'll try my friends guitar to see if that helps, I'm pretty sure he has a humbucker and I know I don't have one. How far would we have to be apart for the interference to subside?

Concerning the lead and pedal possibility, well, like I said, when I use exactly the same equipment at home, there is no problem, so I highly doubt its that.

Thanks guys though, gives me some ideas.

its not so much the distance from each guitarist, more from appliences such as tvs radios, micrwaves, stuff like that. try to keep away from that kind of stuf
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#6
Lol, where we practice, its pretty stripped down, a small insulated room with 5 guys, a drum kit, three amps, an unplugged dvd player of questionable origin, some random guy's bike, and a whole lot of little red plastic stools. Not a microwave, fridge, or tv anywhere on the horizon. I was thinking, could it be caused by all the wires in the room though?
#7
Is it plugged into the same socket as tons of other stuff? That could do it.

Or even a single badly-shielded cable going into the same wall socket could cause you grief. See if it buzzes when your amp is the only thing plugged into the socket.
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