#1
Well, I changed my strings from .9 to .11, and after a few weeks I began to notice my neck bends a little. The action is raised, and I am worried the bend is permanent. I would greatly appreciate it if someone could tell me if this bending is permanent or not, and how to fix it. If it helps, my guitar is a schecter c1 classic.

If I push down the low E on the first and 24th fret, there is about a millimeter of space between the string and the 12th fret. I was told this should be between .1 and .5 millimeter...?
#3
no it's not permanent, but you need to adjust it for the tension change. take it to a guitar shop and have them adjust your trussrod.
#4
If you try and adjust that truss rod yourself, make sure you don't turn it more than a quarter turn, then wait a few minutes and see what happens before trying it again.
#5
so...the truss rod adjust the tension on the neck? I though it adjusted the curvature of the fretboard (the concave shape of the fretboard, not the bending of the neck)
#6
Quote by Mark G
so...the truss rod adjust the tension on the neck? I though it adjusted the curvature of the fretboard (the concave shape of the fretboard, not the bending of the neck)

It adjusts the lateral bow of the neck. Unless you know exactly what you're doing, DO NOT FUCK WITH IT.
- FJ

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#7
^ I disagree. People are so scared of truss rod adjustments. It's silly. Just treat it with respect and you can't hurt your guitar.

First, gauge the relief of the neck. You do that by putting a capo at the first fret, holding down the low E string at the last fret, and then looking for a space between the bottom of the E string and the top of the 8th fret. There should be a very slight gap there. If it's any wider than, say, the thickness of a credit card, you need to tighten your truss rod. Do it 1/8 - 1/4 of a turn at a time and then let the guitar sit. Give the wood time to settle in after the adjustment. When you get a pro setup, sometimes they'll let the guitar sit for a day after doing a truss rod adjustment.
Hi, I'm Peter
#8
Quote by Dirk Gently
^ I disagree. People are so scared of truss rod adjustments. It's silly. Just treat it with respect and you can't hurt your guitar.

First, gauge the relief of the neck. You do that by putting a capo at the first fret, holding down the low E string at the last fret, and then looking for a space between the bottom of the E string and the top of the 8th fret. There should be a very slight gap there. If it's any wider than, say, the thickness of a credit card, you need to tighten your truss rod. Do it 1/8 - 1/4 of a turn at a time and then let the guitar sit. Give the wood time to settle in after the adjustment. When you get a pro setup, sometimes they'll let the guitar sit for a day after doing a truss rod adjustment.


+1. The key here is patience. Make small changes, let them sit, rinse and repeat as necessary. That or let a professional do it.

Regards,

Rob
#10
That was a dumb move. Moving from .9 to .11 can really **** up your neck. But, since it's done, bring it to a shop.
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#11
if I were to do it myself, which way would I turn the truss rod?

would putting .10 or even .9 on again fix the problem too? this truss rod talk is beginning to scare me
#12
^ Don't let it. People treat truss rods like Muslims treat images of Muhammed.

You will NOT fuck up your guitar going up 2 guage sizes. The idea is stupid. However, if you ever want to go back down to 9s or 10s, you may have to replace your nut because larger string sizes will wear your nut slots slightly wider. ANY adjustments that need to be made to a guitar you can do yourself. You just HAVE to be patient and methodical. Respect the fact that your guitar is not indestructible and you will have no problems. If you feel more comfortable using .11s, do it. Just be prepared to have to do a few rudimentary adjustments if you do.

As far as which way to turn it, put your guitar so the headstock is towards you and the body is away from you. To reduce the bow in your neck, you have to tighten your truss rod, so you'd turn the nut clockwise (btw, if you have a truss rod nut that's not in your headstock, let us know).
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at Jan 26, 2007,
#13
alright, I feel better lol. so, I should turn the truss rod no more than 1/4 per day, do I turn it clockwise or counter clockwise? looking down from the head to the body
#15
^ No, that isn't true. The neck should have a slight bend to it. It should not be straight.
Quote by Mark G
alright, I feel better lol. so, I should turn the truss rod no more than 1/4 per day, do I turn it clockwise or counter clockwise? looking down from the head to the body

You can do it more than once per day, but the point is that you should let it settle. Maybe let it sit for about an hour or so before re-measuring. You turn it clockwise to tighten it. But make sure you gauge your neck relief first to make sure it's a truss rod adjustment you need.
Hi, I'm Peter
#17
Guys... after reading this I freaked. I didn't want any of my guitars to have they're necks bent. I went to a local shop and their adjusting the truss and vailence(?) of the guitar for 16.50 a piece. I brought in the 3 PRS's and moved from .11 strings to .12's. Total of like.... $71 wowza... this stuff aint cheap!
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#18
that taylor guitar guide explained it perfectly, thank you! I think I'm going to adjust the truss rod myself tomorrow, slow and steady etc. Thanks everyone for the help!
#19
you need to adjust the trus rod, a pro in a guitar store would do it better and quicker for you


the problem is that there's a lot more tension on the neck and that causes the string to bend
#20
Quote by JJK
That was a dumb move. Moving from .9 to .11 can really **** up your neck. But, since it's done, bring it to a shop.


Not really, I've changed from .9 to .12 (or maybe even .13, idk) and I havent had any problems with the neck. (it's an ESP LTD EX-50)
#21
I fixed the problem by turning the truss rod about 3/8th of a turn. Thank you all for the help
WTLTL 2011
#22
^ You touched your truss rod and your guitar didn't explode? Holy shit!

Glad to be of service.
Hi, I'm Peter
#23
this guitar is my baby, I will check everything 100x and then some before messing with anything lol
WTLTL 2011
#24
damn.... ya know.... if I knew it was that easy I wouldn't have shelled out $80 now (they found a spring that needed replacing! right...) .12's suck on the 3rd string down btw
Mesa Dual Rec/ Mesa 4X12 cab
01 PRS Custom 22
06 PRS Singlecut Ann.
1965 Fender Mustang
Ibanez acoustic
AceFrehley Epiphone LP
Takamine Explorer
tr-2 tu-2 / EHX DMM / MXR Script Phase 90 / SMM w/ HAZR
WH-1 Whammy / 535Q Crybaby