#1
I learned how to play rhythmn and now I'm gonna get into solos. Is it better if I learn how to play easy solos before getting into hard stuff 'cause I want to play Pantera solos which is pretty hard, I think. Thanks
#2
There is nothing more satisfying then playing your own solo. I've been playing guitar for six years, and just recently started learning other solos. Take the time of day to learn your scales, and learn to improvise over them, and in what situations to use them.

It will make you an infinitely better guitar player than being able to play the solo frmo Stairway.
Your Majesty | All Lyrics/Melody/Piano/Guitar parts written by me. Please have a listen.
#3
Quote by anoceanapart
There is nothing more satisfying then playing your own solo. I've been playing guitar for six years, and just recently started learning other solos. Take the time of day to learn your scales, and learn to improvise over them, and in what situations to use them.

It will make you an infinitely better guitar player than being able to play the solo frmo Stairway.



I couldn't agree more. It's deffinately better to express yourself than just play what someone else did, but there can be advantages to learning someone elses solos, like taking licks you like from their solos and encorporating them into your own stuff. Like anoceanapart said learn your scales, there's no weapon more powerful for a lead player then his scale and note selection. As far as playing Pantera solos unless you have really good right and left hand technique I would say start simpler, crawl before you run man, dime was fast and precise, intimately knowing his scales and which phrases he wanted to produce, if you start with something thats too hard for you you will most likely burn out and feel like you can't succeede. One of the best ways to come up with a unique style of your own is to combine licks from multiple influences, like Stevie Ray Vaughn did with all the old blues players, he analyzed their playing and broke it down into which licks he liked most, then combined all his favorite licks from many styles of music to create a sound all his own. I don't have any idea what your capabilities are, but this is my best advice, hope it helps.
#4
learn easy solos and pentatonic scales, then improvise over those solos, then star creating your own solos
#5
Quote by Phelious
I couldn't agree more. It's deffinately better to express yourself than just play what someone else did, but there can be advantages to learning someone elses solos, like taking licks you like from their solos and encorporating them into your own stuff. Like anoceanapart said learn your scales, there's no weapon more powerful for a lead player then his scale and note selection. As far as playing Pantera solos unless you have really good right and left hand technique I would say start simpler, crawl before you run man, dime was fast and precise, intimately knowing his scales and which phrases he wanted to produce, if you start with something thats too hard for you you will most likely burn out and feel like you can't succeede. One of the best ways to come up with a unique style of your own is to combine licks from multiple influences, like Stevie Ray Vaughn did with all the old blues players, he analyzed their playing and broke it down into which licks he liked most, then combined all his favorite licks from many styles of music to create a sound all his own. I don't have any idea what your capabilities are, but this is my best advice, hope it helps.


Wow, we should sticky this thread, cause you hit the nail on the head here. I couldnt have put it better. Learn your scale, and do learn other people solos. I did it for the first 2 years of playing guitar, and now I have this arsenal of licks that I often whip out in jazz band. Which brings me to my next point. Dont do dru...Just kidding, umm, but seriously dont do drugs now that im talking about it. Listening to jazz music, no matter how dull it might sound to you, will give you such an eye opener to the solos that are out there. In most all jazz cds, its mostly solo. Improv. So listen to that, and get some sweet licks out of there, cause these guys are pro. Some of my favorites are from Miles Davis. So good. And once you have some knowledge of scales and keys etc, then try to solo over other stuff. Dont go too hard though, cause you will crash and burn and feel like shit. Start easy.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


Screaming Help
#6
Um...yeah. Pretty much what's already been said. I, too, would definitely NOT recommend starting solos by making your own. Chances are, they wouldn't be very good.
#7
Quote by yawn
Um...yeah. Pretty much what's already been said. I, too, would definitely NOT recommend starting solos by making your own. Chances are, they wouldn't be very good.


So there we have it, finally a group of people that agrees that learning other peoples solos are good. Now to convince the other 400,000 members of UG to think that.
Quote by funkdaddyfresh
justin, that was easily the most inspiring, helpful piece of advice anyone has ever given me in regards to my musical pursuits.


Screaming Help
#8
Quote by justin_fraser
So there we have it, finally a group of people that agrees that learning other peoples solos are good. Now to convince the other 400,000 members of UG to think that.
For the sake of consistency with UG's orthodox standards, I take it back.


Threadstarter! Write your own solos before learning anyone else's!

It'll make you more original and unique!