#1
quick question, are the patterns for minor scales the same as majors, but moved three frets up on the fretboard?
#2
No. That would give you a major scale moved a step and a half up.
G natural minor (by way of example) is most commonly either:
E|------------------------------3-5-6-|
B|------------------------3-4-6-------|
G|--------------------3-5-------------|
D|--------------3-5-7-----------------|
A|--------3-5-6-----------------------|
E|--3-5-6-----------------------------|

or
E|------------------------------3-5-6-|
B|------------------------3-4-6-------|
G|------------------2-3-5-------------|
D|--------------3-5-------------------|
A|--------3-5-6-----------------------|
E|--3-5-6-----------------------------|
#3
no, major scale patterns that are played three frets higher on the fret board than their natural minor patterns contain the same notes, but in a different order. The reason they are not the same pattern is the scale is defined by the steps between each note. However, natural minor scales contain the same notes as their major scale conterparts, so you can just skip the the first 2 notes of a natural minor's scale and you will be starting at the root note of the coinciding major.
#4
what i mean to say is, if the following patterns (for c major scale)
C major
E0|1-|--|3-|--|5-|--|7-|8-|--|10|--|12|13|--|15|--|17|--|19|20|--|22|--|24|
B0|1-|--|3-|--|5-|6-|--|8-|--|10|--|12|13|--|15|--|17|18|--|20|--|22|--|24|
G0|--|2-|--|4-|5-|--|7-|--|9-|10|--|12|--|14|--|16|17|--|19|--|21|22|--|24|
D0|--|2-|3-|--|5-|--|7-|--|9-|10|--|12|--|14|15|--|17|--|19|--|21|22|--|24|
A0|--|2-|3-|--|5-|--|7-|8-|--|10|--|12|--|14|15|--|17|--|19|20|--|22|--|24|
E0|1-|--|3-|--|5-|--|7-|8-|--|10|--|12|13|--|15|--|17|--|19|20|--|22|--|24|

are shifted up the fretboard 3 frets, they become c minor scale patterns, right?

just wondering because it seems like a good shortcut to learning the minor scale possies
cheers
#5
yes, that would be true, they would all be notes in the c minor, because C is the natural minor of d#/eb
#6
thanks for the replies. ok so would this apply to all major keys? can i shift the patterns for any major scale up 3 frets to play it in a minor key?
#7
Ah, now I see what you meant.

ps. If you're posting tab or diagrams, use [code] tags so that it's in a fixed-width font.
E0|1-|--|3-|--|5-|--|7-|8-|--|10|--|12|13|--|15|--|17|--|19|20|--|22|--|24|
B0|1-|--|3-|--|5-|6-|--|8-|--|10|--|12|13|--|15|--|17|18|--|20|--|22|--|24|
G0|--|2-|--|4-|5-|--|7-|--|9-|10|--|12|--|14|--|16|17|--|19|--|21|22|--|24|
D0|--|2-|3-|--|5-|--|7-|--|9-|10|--|12|--|14|15|--|17|--|19|--|21|22|--|24|
A0|--|2-|3-|--|5-|--|7-|8-|--|10|--|12|--|14|15|--|17|--|19|20|--|22|--|24|
E0|1-|--|3-|--|5-|--|7-|8-|--|10|--|12|13|--|15|--|17|--|19|20|--|22|--|24|
#8
That is a fine "shortcut", although it doesnt really accomplish much other than realizing the relationship between majors and natural minors and knowing one or two places to realistically play that scale. I say that b/c one great benefit of knowing minor and major patterns is that they interlock, and all the notes sound right b/c they are all in both scales, it just gives you more places on the fretboard to find them.
#9
yes, any major scale played a step and a half higher becomes the minor scale.
#10
thanks esbee for your help, i will use this shortcut to learn the scales for drills, but will of course eventually get into learning about relative minors