#1
.. And liked it. As I am really new to soloing and improvising, it really helped. (Plus I'm self taught, so a good video is always nice.)

But there's one thing I don't get. Say we have a song in the key of G.

The chord progression goes G, D, C. (SOmething I think sounds good :-D and very common >.<

So, when the G chord is going, by the rythm guitar player or in my head, I would play with some major scale in G. But when D comes, would I play in the Major D scale, like the chord, or would I use the 5th mode whose name I cant't remember? The same with C - would I use the 4th mode or the Ionian like always?

And plus, under any of those chords, I can just switch to their relative minor scale, right? Instead of G major, E minor, instead of C, A minor, and Bm instead of D? Or, if I have to switch modes after every chord change, would I be using C in the fourth mode and then A in the Dorian mode, (the mode "two steps" back?)?

Hope I got the question across right. Thanks!
#2
Look at the section about arpeggiating(sp?) the chord changes. It is alot easier than scale hopping.

Also, if your chords are all in the same key, you could play in the same scale position, but the backing chords would turn it into a different mode, giving it a really interesting sound.

You don't have to hop around scales when your chords are all in same key, rather just target root notes of the chord changes or play arpeggios to match the chords.
#3
Arpeggiating the chords would basically be playing the major scale of the current chord, though, right? Because you'd probably be messing around the arpeggio shape?

And if you played in the same scale, but accented the notes that are in the chords you are currently playing, you're kind of switching modes in a passive way?

Well, theres nothing stopping somebeody from doing both, but I'm just wondering what's "standard."
#4
the chords G-D-C are are still in the key of G major. So bassicaly you should keep playing in that key, paying extra attention to the chord tones (D > D F# D // C > C E G). The changing chords will make your playing sound great and melodic.
#5
Okay, some of this is slightly over my head. I guess my example was bad, since it was just the ´tonic, subdominant and dominant as chords. What if you had something kind of disharmonic, like G=>F=>A. What would you do then?
#6
I get it now, the chords C and D have 3'rd and 5ths that are a part of the key of G. What if it was in the key of D, with the chords A and G? And so on, with all subdominants and dominants? I would like to learn the rule/relations here, not just with the G=>D=>C example.

EDIT: And the same applied to D and its subdominant and dominant, A and G. The notes in the A and G chords were in the D major scale. Is this a general rule?
Last edited by Harwood at Jan 26, 2007,
#7
yeah, that is a general rule... you could easily stay in the same key using the subdominant and dominant chord. It's getting difficult when you have chords with notes that are NOT in the key you started from. Your example progression D-A-G Is still a good progression. The chords all still fit the key of D major.
#8
Alright, I got that part. But if you were using chords that don't fit in the key, (I'm sure it happens?) is there any rule to it? Or are you "breaking the rules" already at that point, and anything beyond is kind of your own call?

I think my original question is answered, though. When playing over the C chord in the G progression, you would technically be playing the 4th mode in C, which is the same as the notes in major G, so you're actually not changing anything.

Do I seem to have the general idea? >.>
#9
Yeah I think using chords that are not in the key, would be "breaking the rules." I would probably recommend not using this sort of thing, it usually doesn't sound good.

If you would happen to hear something like that or do something like that, I guess I would recommend arpeggiating the said chord that is not in the key. Just stay consistant with what the rest of the song is doing is my suggestion.
#10
Well, I got that then. A song is generally based on one scale, unless it switches keys. Thanks.
#11
You use more non-scale chords than you think... for example a Emajor chord played in the key of Aminor, this is an example using harmonic minor. The song is in Aminor but by playing an E chord just before you hit an Aminor chord makes is harmonically rich. You use and G# tone in the key of Aminor.
#12
Yes and A major - G major - D major sounds fantastic, but the G major chord isn't in A major, it's in A mixolydian.
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#13
Alright, so you can use other chords in the keys "major zone," which includes notes from any of its major scales? And that "using a chord to enrich the next one thing" is kind of like what they do in STH during the verse, isn't it? They use E major => Aminor, played directly after one another..

Can you explain the "harmonic" minor to me? I understand the relative minor, which is the tone two steps back in the major scale's minor chord. And the parallel minor, which is the same chord as the major but you just make it minor. But what's the harmonic minor?

Also, as posted above, you said to accent the notes that are being played in the chord progression when it comes to them. Would you sometimes do that by switching modes over to it? Or by repeatably coming back to that note?

Thanks for the help so far!
#14
Quote by Harwood
Can you explain the "harmonic" minor to me? I understand the relative minor, which is the tone two steps back in the major scale's minor chord. And the parallel minor, which is the same chord as the major but you just make it minor. But what's the harmonic minor?
Harmonic minor is a variation of the minor scale. In harmonic minor, the seventh is natural, raised a half-step from where it normally is in the minor scale.

Intervals of natural minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Intervals of harmonic minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7
#15
I was confused about how putting a Major E in a Minor A progression makes it a harmonic minor? Wouldn't that be putting in a major 7th instead of a minor 7th, which would be from a G=>G#, not anything to do with E?
#16
Quote by Harwood
I was confused about how putting a Major E in a Minor A progression makes it a harmonic minor? Wouldn't that be putting in a major 7th instead of a minor 7th, which would be from a G=>G#, not anything to do with E?
Well when you make the G in an Em chord (from A natural minor) G#, it becomes E major (from harmonic minor).

The natural seventh doesn' have to have anything to do with E major, but it is common to play E major instead of in minor in an A minor progression.