#1
Can knowledge of music theory help with rhythm and whatnot? I guess that's my main question, how can knowledge of music theory increase your understanding of rhythm? Like, where to put half-notes, quarter-notes, eighth-notes, etc. in your music; can that be influenced at all by theory? Or is that just what sounds good to your ears?
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#2
Yes, that can be influenced by theory

Theory = What the time values are, stuff like that

Of course, what sounds good is most important but I would assume that is tied in with the theory
#4
Yea, reading sheet music and understanding things like 4/3 time and what not. But most of the time, at least for me, listening to the music and trying different rythmns is how to pick it up the best.
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#5
^ i don't think there is 4/3 time sig, but i do know there is a compound time sig of 16/12, from what i understand the beat length (bottom #) is always even, mods correct me if im wrong. as far as music theory goes it is neverending, it goes on forever, thats why its theory and not fact, its always being updated, rhythmically i find that whatever sounds good is good. if you think something sounds sweet theres pretty much guaranteed some theory to explain why it sounds good.
#6
It helps with everything. The great thing is, I'm not even hyperbolizing.
#7
Quote by z4twenny
^ i don't think there is 4/3 time sig, but i do know there is a compound time sig of 16/12, from what i understand the beat length (bottom #) is always even, mods correct me if im wrong. as far as music theory goes it is neverending, it goes on forever, thats why its theory and not fact, its always being updated, rhythmically i find that whatever sounds good is good. if you think something sounds sweet theres pretty much guaranteed some theory to explain why it sounds good.


Yea, I probably reversed that and meant 3/4. I couldn't remember if it was 4/3 or the other way around. But I do wonder if it's possible. Hmmm.
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#8
Denominator of a time signature has to be 2, 4, 8, 16, I dunno if it goes to 32, 64, and 128 though. I do remember hearing something about a 128th note

The numerator can be anything though. Compound time is hard for me to grasp. I don't get pulses and such. For example, there are supposed to be three pulses is 5/8 time, wtf? My theory book explains it but I just can't understand it. Oh well, I'm sure it's not a required rule to have three 'pulses.'
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#9
^ basic movement in 5/8 will have a pulse on 1,3 & 5. its easy to midi map out, but it takes a little practice to get used to odd time sigs. as far as i know the idea of 16/12 isn't really possible.