#1
Yes. So in music we are doin pavan and galliard, and we are supposed to go home and learn about cadences. i read the article on UG about them but didnt really get a lot out of it. If someone could give me an explanation and a few examples in LAYMANS TERMS i would be very pleased.
Cheers.
#2
Sethmegadefan just recently submitted a column all about cadences. You should check it out. It was very informative and taught me a thing or two.
LOL
#3
There's 3 types of cadences that you're going to be looking for most likely. Authentic, plagal and deceptive.

A perfect authentic cadence consists of a V-I progression, with both chords in root position.

A deceptive cadence is the V chord followed by any chord other than I, though it's most commonly the vi chord.

A plagal cadence is a IV-I progression, both being in root position.

Hope this helps.
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#4
just as a little addition, if you are taking a theory class there are a few other cadances and details you should know about.

1. Perfect Authentic Cadence (PAC)- a V-I (or V-i) where both chords are in root position and the soprano line of the passage ends on the root/tonic of the I chord

2. Imperfect Authentic Cadence(s)
A. V-I where the soprano does NOT end on the root/tonic of the I chord
B. Inverted IAC- either or both chords are in an inversion
C. Leading tone IAC- viiº-I (put the viiº in first inversion because it is not considered "good voice leading" to double the leading tone)

3. Deceptive cadence- as said earlier in the forum V-? (chord other than I but most likely a vi) BUT... in order to properly resolve the V-vi transition, the leading tone(7th scale degreee) in the V must resolve UP to the tonic of the key in the vi chord ALSO... the second scale degree in the V chord must resolve DOWN to the tonic of the key

4. Plagal cadence- IV-I in root position

5. Phrygian Half cadence- iv(first inversion)-V in a minor key

6. Half cadence- any phrase that ends on a V chord that doesn't resolve to the I chord.


just make sure to resolve all leading tones, watch out for the V-vi resolution (that one always got me in trouble in class), and good luck!!

Oh, and these cadences work in both major and minor keys, just make sure to put in the proper diationic triads.
#5
^^ I've noticed that you call the V-vi cadence a 'Deceptive' cadence.

Where I'm from, it's called an interrupted cadence.

AND SO I WATCH YOU FROM AFAR

#6
Quote by anoceanapart
There's 3 types of cadences that you're going to be looking for most likely. Authentic, plagal and deceptive.

A perfect authentic cadence consists of a V-I progression, with both chords in root position.

A deceptive cadence is the V chord followed by any chord other than I, though it's most commonly the vi chord.

A plagal cadence is a IV-I progression, both being in root position.

Hope this helps.

Sort of. The root has to be in the bass and the soprano parts for the perfect authentic cadence.

Edit: Just random information. The plagal cadence is also called the 'Amen cadence' by some people because in Hymns when the choir sings AAAAA- Meeeen, it is 99.9% a IV-I.
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#7
Quote by Morgy
^^ I've noticed that you call the V-vi cadence a 'Deceptive' cadence.

Where I'm from, it's called an interrupted cadence.


w/e it's really all the same. i guess it's just called a deceptive cadence where i'm from because with the voice leading of the V chord your ear is expecting to hear the tonic. And then,....(dramatic music) low and behold, the music decieves your ear!! but that's interesting, i've never heard it called called an interrupted cadence before...