#1
Ok, I was reading that the notes can be played at exactly the same pitch across the fretboard. You can play a note in many positions with the exact same pitch but a slightly diff. tonality. My question is this, whenever you play C for example, and wherever you play it, as long as you are playing C, does the note always have the same pitch??? Just depending on which octave you are playing it in, does it always have the same pitch but a slightly diff. tone???

When you play a certain note in two diff. octaves over the fretboard, do they still retain the same pitch but just a diff. tone depending on the position???
#3
play this....

a----0------(E note) Same
E-5--------- (E note) Pitches

Or....

d-----------0- (D note)
a-------5-----(D note) Same Pitches
E--10--------(Dnote)
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#4
So you can have the same note with diff. pitches???

If so, what is it that classifies it as a "note" ? I thought a note was the symbol of a pitch.
#5
I'm wondering cause I have a book that shows how you can play the notes at the exact same pitches at diff. places on the fretboard, with a lightly diff. tonality. Then it goes on to show how to change fingering positions to play scales in other octaves, so I am assuming that the key note, regardless where you begin the scale has the same pitch, just diff. tonality depending on the octave. Would this be correct?
#6
Quote by CousticStrangla
So you can have the same note with diff. pitches???

If so, what is it that classifies it as a "note" ? I thought a note was the symbol of a pitch.


It can not be the same note if it has different pitches. Yes, a note is a symbol of a pitch. If you played what that guy said, and it sounded like the notes were different, then your guitar is out of tune. Those should be the same notes, but like you said before, the different tonality. And all of your questions as far as I can see are answered by a 'yes'. When you play higher up on the low strings, it gives a more of a warm sound. Whereas if you would play those from fret 1 to 5 on the high string, it would be a more trebly sound (at least to me).
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#7
Thanks for the response. So I was correct in my assumption that same note=same pitch, wherever the note is played, just diff. tonal quality?
#8
Ok, you seem completely clueless as to everything. So lets get this down, here are the strings....
e Highest pitch
b
g You probably notice that there are 2 E's
d These are two octaves apart.
a
E Lowest pitch

"octaves" are the same note at different pitches.
Here are your notes:
A, A# (#=sharp), B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A. The beginning and ending notes are octaves. You'll also notice that if you count it out, playing from open then up, you end on a double dotted fret. This is the 12th fret, it is an octave of the open sting.
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Boss Flange