#1
I hear alot about arpeggios, and I already know decent amount about scales, but I haven't tryed learning about arpeggios. What are they exactly? From what I can see its just playing the notes of a chord, like for major arpeggios you play the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes of the scale. Is that right? what role do they play in soloing and how should I go about learning them?
#2
they are basically the notes of a chord played individually like a scale, you can use the octave of a chord thats being played for rhythm during a solo, theres probably a book on them
#3
yeah ur pretty much right, it's taking a chord and playing the individual tones instead of the entire thing, like fret a Cmajor chord and pick each string individually, and u are arpreggiating a Cmajor chord...i don't like shred any, but i know that that's what it's used for in soloing mainly, but other guitarists use it in there solos (it just sounds cool sometimes), listen to the first solo from david gilmour in comforatbly numb, he arppregiates some chords, there are a lot of other examples, but none come to mind right now, except for that last solo in rocket queen from guns n' roses, anywayz, pretty much, just learn ur chords and scales and find them on ur guitar and memorize the patterns they make in as many places as u like on the guitar, that way you can easily play them back and transpose them back and forth, hope this helps
#4
Alright, so are arpeggios very important for soloing though? I want to improve my lead guitar.
#5
1st, 3rd, and 5th would be a triad. Play 1st, 3rd, 5th, Octave, and maybe add a 10th, then it's an arpeggio. Just learn and memorize the shape of a major and minor arpeggio. The good thing about using them is that they are all strong notes in the scale, so if you play those notes, even if its not in scalar order, you will never play any "bad" notes.
#6
Quote by DoctrDrew116
1st, 3rd, and 5th would be a triad. Play 1st, 3rd, 5th, Octave, and maybe add a 10th, then it's an arpeggio.
No.

An arpeggio is simply when you play the notes of a chord individually. You can arpegiate triad chords, seventh chords, suspended chords, anything really.

They are used in soloing as nice sounding licks. Sometimes they are sweep picked, but often not. There is an excellent article about arpeggios in the UG lesson archive.
#7
Quote by FlyF1402
Alright, so are arpeggios very important for soloing though? I want to improve my lead guitar.


well it depends, there are a lot of styles of soloing, it just depends on the style u want to pursue, people that play shred generally play crazy fast arppregios, so if you like that then practice it and it will improve ur shred skills, but some guitarists just like to use them once in a while to add a different kind of sound, like those two songs that i reffered to before, but in any case, it's good to know them and try to incorporate them, but they aren't CRUCIAL soloing, if ur going for more of a blues sorta style pentatonics and stuff around that are what most blues guitarists use
#8
I'm not a big shredding fan, I think after a point it stops being musical. but anyway, I think I want to learn a little about them to improve my soloing, because I wanna use more than just pentatonic and blues scales to solo, I'm looking to become somewhat versatile.
#9
Quote by FlyF1402
I'm not a big shredding fan, I think after a point it stops being musical. but anyway, I think I want to learn a little about them to improve my soloing, because I wanna use more than just pentatonic and blues scales to solo, I'm looking to become somewhat versatile.
Arps are common in shred, but they are used in plenty of other places. You can use them a part of a nice melody (like Knopfler-see lesson) or as part of a rhythm passage (Hotel California). Or you can zip through them like Yngwie.
#10
ok, try taking ur typical D-major, D-minor shapes, and arppregiating them somewhere else on the guitar like these...

---10----------------11------------------------
-------12----------------12----------------------
-----------11-----------------11-----------------
----------------(12)--------------(13)-----------
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also try taking ur typical barre chords and playing parts of them at other positions, like

Em Am
-12------------------12----------------------------
-----12-------------------13--------------------
----------12-------------------14-------------------
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