#1
I'm getting into neoclassical pretty hardcore, and I was just wondering what some good scales for it was. I know one harmonic minor shape, so I should probably work on that before I learn anymore. And I have trouble working out good stuff in other scales and modes, like in the harmonic minor and the aeolian mode. When I play stuff in that, it doesnt sound as good as the stuff I play whenever I'm using the minor penatonic scales. Maybe I just need more practice with it.
..::RIP::..
Randy Rhoads & Dimebag
#2
Yeah practice it and emphasise the key points about that scale, eg. natural minor with the flat 3rd and the 6th. There is also the Phrygian Dominant mode, which souns a lot like harmonic minor, the formula for it is

Root, semitone, tone and a semitone, semitone, tone, tone (i think!)

sounds great!
#3
im wit Jaff you need to really show the characteristics of what you're playing, try to get a backing track or some sort of progression so you can hear the character of the scales and get a feel for the sound of that scale over different chords
-Mike
#5
Quote by CowboyUp
Arpeggios, sweeping.


I'm sorry. I've never heard of the "Arpeggio" Scale, or the "Sweeping" Scale...
Quote by Kensai
Racism... against the human race? Sure, go ahead
#6
Quote by Generalpwnt
I'm sorry. I've never heard of the "Arpeggio" Scale, or the "Sweeping" Scale...


Go kill yourself, and while you are in heaven learn how to be funny when you are sarcastic.
#7
Quote by CowboyUp
Go kill yourself, and while you are in heaven learn how to be funny when you are sarcastic.


How kind of you to assume my ascension towards heaven. I love you.
Quote by Kensai
Racism... against the human race? Sure, go ahead
#9
I'm sorry, but this is a major point of contention for me; please desist from calling it "neoclassical".

Stravinski was neoclassical.

Yngwie is not even close.
#10
Quote by Nick_
I'm sorry, but this is a major point of contention for me; please desist from calling it "neoclassical".

Stravinski was neoclassical.

Yngwie is not even close.



Whatever you say mister Holier Than Thou.
#11
Hey it just bothers me how that label got misapplied and ended up in common usage

I suppose I should just let it go, huh?
#12
Quote by Nick_
I'm sorry, but this is a major point of contention for me; please desist from calling it "neoclassical".

Stravinski was neoclassical.

Yngwie is not even close.


Neo means new, or a revival of the olde, correct? In that sense Yngwie is neo-classical even though you might not see it as so. While it may not be like Stravinski's style of neo-classical it is still a form of neo-classical. So I will continue to call it neo-classical because that's what it is.
Quote by Kensai
Racism... against the human race? Sure, go ahead
#13
I suppose in a very literal, semantic, sense

but the term "neoclassical" was in use describing something very different long before Yngwie et al. were even born

So I don't think it's appropriate
#14
Quote by Nick_
I suppose in a very literal, semantic, sense

but the term "neoclassical" was in use describing something very different long before Yngwie et al. were even born

So I don't think it's appropriate
Rock describes something invented several decades before I was born. I suppose I can't play rock, right?


I see where you're coming from, though. The thing is, you'r ethe only one who brought up Yngwie. While Yngwie's music can be specifically called neo-classical metal, it's still a form of new classical music. Sort of.
#15
Quote by Nick_
I suppose in a very literal, semantic, sense

but the term "neoclassical" was in use describing something very different long before Yngwie et al. were even born

So I don't think it's appropriate


The word Negro meant something else way before now. Now it's used by gangstahs as a way to signify friendship and love.
Quote by Kensai
Racism... against the human race? Sure, go ahead
#16
Quote by dolmetsh dictionary of music
Neo-classical: (literally, 'new classicism') in music, a twentieth-century interest in concerto grosso form and contraputal writing, both associated with music from the classical period
in European art and architecture, a style in vogue from the mid 18th century until the end of the 19th century. Based as it was on the use of ancient Greek and Roman models and motifs, its development was greatly influenced by the excavations at Pompeii and Herculaneum, and by the theories of the German art historian Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717-1768). Intellectually and politically it was closely linked to the Enlightenment's rejection of the aristocratic frivolity of Rococo, the style of the Ancien Régime. Among Neoclassicism's leading figures were the French painter Jacques-Louis David (1744-1825), the German painter Anton Raffael Mengs (1728-1729), and the Italian sculptor Antonio Canova (1757-1822)
what any 'neo'-classicism depends on most fundamentally is a consensus about a body of work that has achieved canonic status. These are the 'classics'. Ideally — and neoclassicism is essentially an art of an ideal — an artist, well-schooled and comfortably familiar with the canon, does not repeat it in lifeless reproductions, but synthesizes the tradition anew in each work. This sets a high standard, clearly; but though a neoclassical artist who fails to achieve it may create works that are inane, vacuous or even mediocre, gaffes of taste and failures of craftsmanship are not commonly neoclassical failings. Novelty, improvisation, self-expression, and blinding inspiration are not neoclassical virtues; neoclassicism exhibits perfect control of an idiom. It does not recreate art forms from the ground up with each new project, as modernism demanded. "Make it new" was the modernist credo of the poet Ezra Pound


What I was saying is that "actual" neoclassical that was practiced before these metuhl types is a very different kind music then ripping off bach melodies
#17
Try the good ole major scale. It can utilized quite well.

Also melodic minor and harmonic minor.


You might also want to try the whole tone scales.
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Hit this once or twice, and you'll be twice as nice.
#18
Quote by Nick_
What I was saying is that "actual" neoclassical that was practiced before these metuhl types is a very different kind music then ripping off bach melodies


Understood. Tomato, tomahto. I prefer apples.
Quote by Kensai
Racism... against the human race? Sure, go ahead
#19
We're cool then

as I said, it's just something that tends to really bother me

that and people who play that kind of music acting elitist because they have a rudimentary understanding of baroque forms

and it's all about bananas
#20
Ok, well whatever its called, it doesnt matter. Anyways, I dont feel like making another thread, so I'll just ask it here. I know Yngwie uses fender strats. I'm wanting a Jackson DK2 Dinky, but I dont know how well it'll work with that kinda music (yngwie-ish stuff). And I dont know how the DK2 is set up. Is the volume knob the knob that is closest to the strings?? Because I wanna be able to do the volume swells, and I cant do that if its all the way on the other end of the guitar.
..::RIP::..
Randy Rhoads & Dimebag
#21
yea, it's the volume knob. why don't you try it out? i like the guitar but i'm more of a hard rock guy.
Member of the Jackson/Charvel Owners Group
#22
Quote by Generalpwnt
I'm sorry. I've never heard of the "Arpeggio" Scale, or the "Sweeping" Scale...


Generalpwnt got ... pwnt

If you're being sarcastic ... your sense of humour sucks.
And if not, he means use arpeggios and sweep picking in your playing, they're a big part of that Neoclassical / Hardcore genre.
R E G G A E
#23
Quote by 666_Belial
yea, it's the volume knob. why don't you try it out? i like the guitar but i'm more of a hard rock guy.



Try out the volume swells or the DK2?? I'll just answer them both. There is no store in my state, lol, (WV) that sells good equipment, so I could never try out a DK2. I can do the volume swells, but I cant pick the note, I have to hammer on with my left hand and do the volume swell with my right hand because the volume knob is so far away from the strings.
..::RIP::..
Randy Rhoads & Dimebag