#1
Greetings....(and for my first post)

Short story...

The guitar has an original Floyd Rose...was sent to the shop to install correctly. I had no idea what I was doing since I basically piecemealed this guitar out of parts I've been buying since the early 80's. It really is a great beastie.

Had repairs down at a shop to lower action, as well, but it was too low and hitting frets so I shimmed the nut to increase action at lower frets. However, the locknut was not alligned (I fixed that).

I'm also playing Ernie Ball "skinnytop/Heavybottom" strings (10, 13, 17, 30, 42, 52...I love em). So when I put those stings on last night and realized it needed another spring in the back for balance.

I'm pretty sure I got the balance (cross fingers...I ran into that on the lighter strings) I played around with a couple of different springs and ended up with four (two that were tough to pull and two which felt pretty loose). It seems to be tuning rather easily (still got some string streaching going on) while it is free floating.

Everything looks great now...but the intonation is way off... to the point that when its tuned you can not even play open chords without it sounding horriable. You can play 12th fret harmonics and then the open string and the open string and tell that something is way off (all save the low E..it sounds OK).

I messed with the height of the saddle screws on the Floyd Rose and I know this has a large part to due with my problem. But basically I need advice on how to fix this....assuming it is the intonation...it may be I just simply don't know how to tune a Rose (but I seriously doubt that, but I've been stupid in the past).

I'm googling, but would like some first hand advice if you've been through this. Please help!

(apologies if I'm in the wrong forum)
#3
^ thanks for posting and not helping.

Anyways, to adjust the intonation is... I'd get some wood blocks (or something hard and dense) and "block the trem" allowing you to adjust the individual saddles w/o having to worry about tension and all that crap.
#4
Quote by caffeineman
ahem, short story?


yes...it was, there was more...but I got bored and tired of typing.

But if you wanted more I could send you my totally useless 83 page ethogram of the North American River Otter that I had to do in college


Besides...I get to respond which allows me a useless postcount too...yeah!
Last edited by cardboard box at Jan 27, 2007,
#5
Quote by N_I_N-621
^ thanks for posting and not helping.

Anyways, to adjust the intonation is... I'd get some wood blocks (or something hard and dense) and "block the trem" allowing you to adjust the individual saddles w/o having to worry about tension and all that crap.


Agreed, But I think I've gone and caused way more problems for myself by messing around with the actual height of the saddle by unscrewing the actual posts that the saddle floats on. Point being, I think those are for fine tuning...and my problem is a lot more radical that just adjusting those (I think). But thats from eyeballing it and my mathematical standpoint. I think I must first hammer out the saddle hight.

Should the saddle (at the low E) be the same height as the as the 'high e'? I'm reasoning that I should measure the action at the upper frets to fix this first. Then go into your steps.