#1
Say my backing track is in D and I wanted to play in dorian witht he normal dorian box pattern. What would the root have to be to be in key?
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#2
Quote by Devon8822
Say my backing track is in D and I wanted to play in dorian witht he normal dorian box pattern. What would the root have to be to be in key?

What?

If you want to play in the dorian mode. Play in the key of D Minor but play B naturals instead of B flats.
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#3
yea, if you want to play/practice playing the dorian mode in the key of D, you would have to play an E dorian pattern ( E-F#-G-A-B-C#-D-E) over an Em or Em7 chord. if in this backing track a D major came up, you would play a D ionan instead but.....wait i'll just chart it out

1st (scale degree ) Ionian
2nd Dorian
3rd Phrygian
4th Lydian
5th Mixolydian
6th Aeolian
7th Locrian
#4
Quote by fenderfrk10
yea, if you want to play/practice playing the dorian mode in the key of D, you would have to play an E dorian pattern ( E-F#-G-A-B-C#-D-E) over an Em or Em7 chord. if in this backing track a D major came up, you would play a D ionan instead but.....wait i'll just chart it out

1st (scale degree ) Ionian
2nd Dorian
3rd Phrygian
4th Lydian
5th Mixolydian
6th Aeolian
7th Locrian

Well, Dorian in the key of D is D Dorian. E Dorian has the same notes as D major, but it is an E scale
#5
hu.... I thought that if the backing track was in d and I played dorian e than i would still be in ionian.....? wtf?

isn't that correct^^
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Shredding is having control over your instrument and being free of technical obstacles so your music is not limited by your playing ability.

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#6
Quote by Devon8822
hu.... I thought that if the backing track was in d and I played dorian e than i would still be in ionian.....? wtf?

isn't that correct^^
Sort of.

E Dorian does contain the same notes as as D Ionian, but they are very different.

If you play E F# G A B C# D over a D major chord/progression, you are playing D Ionian since your root is D. A scale is not a position on the fretboard. It is simply a group of notes.

Oh, a mode is a type of scale, so no one should try the "you said scales, what about modes?" nonsense.
#7
Okay, if you're playing a backing track in D major then you could play E Dorian if you want to cause it's the same as the D Major scale, but if you play D Dorian in the key of D maj then you're gonna get two really really outside notes. The whole scale to key relationship in my opinion is kind of stupid because all your doing is playing the major scale of that major key in a different position. Modes are really just to be used over specific chords, ex. D lydian over Dmaj7#11 or E Mixolydian over E7 and stuff like that. If your chord progession goes something like a ii-V-I in D, Emin7-A7-Dmaj7 then you can highlight those chords with their respective modes being E dorian, A mixolyidian, and D Ionian or Lydian if you're feeling crazy. The application of modes can get pretty crazy depending on how far you want to go outside the key, the scales I gave wouldn't go outside the key except for the D lydian over Dmaj7 in the Key of D but to me it sounds better. I hope I didn't confuse you, if you have questions you PM me.

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