#1
Hiya

Im new to creating solos and i was wondering:

if i played a song in the key of G...
and the chords during the solo were G, C, D...
would i use the scale of G throughout the solo or solo in the g scale then the c scale then the d scales, when the chords change?

please help!!

thank you
#2
For the example you've given, you could use the G scale throughout. Definately what I'd do.

It's the same in most cases, until you start talking about modes.
#3
You could do either, although personally I'd just stay in G. As long as you don't start using chords outside of the scale it will still sound good.
R E G G A E
#4
does that apply for all keys and chord progressions or just the example ive given?
#5
For that you have a wide range of scales you can use. During the entire progression you can obviously use G major, and all of its modes, seeing as your playing in G. (E minor and B phrygian would be my favorite.)

Then you can get into the the rocknroll style of breaking theory rules. For example, while playing the G, you can play in G minor pentatonic and blues, and when playing in C, you can play C minor pent. and bles, and when playing the D, you can play D minor and blues.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but can G minor pentatonic and blues also be played over the C chord?
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#6
You're all going to hate this.

When you play the notes of the G major scale over of of the chords in G major (not G major), you are no longer playing the "G Major Scale." You are playing the corresponding mode. For instance, if you play a lick that contains the notes in G major over B minor, you are playing B Phrygian. This isn't yo say that when you come across a Bm chord in a G major progression (yes, you can have minor chords in major progressions) you have to play at the 7th fret. Remember, a scale is not a position or a box or a fingering. A scale is simply a group of notes.

So yes, you have to change scales when you change chords. It isn't optional, it is just what happens. However, you don't have to make a conscience decision to do so. The degree you emphasize the chord changes is up to you. You can approach that entire solo as if it is just G major, OR you can really emphasize the modal tones of each chords' corresponding modes (ie you would emphasize C over the D chord but to so much over G).

Marty Friedman explains this a bit in his melodic control video.