#1
Okay have been trying to learn scales so I started with the major pentatonic (5 basic fingerings) and then I looked at one of the lessons on here and it shows the five basic fingerings but then it also shows the scales: A major Pentatonic, B major pentatonic C major pentatonic etc. and that got me even more confused, so can any one show me what the major pentatonic scale is and how to read/play it.

Thanks much appreciated.
#2
Helllllllo!
the name of the scale is based on the root note or the first note of the scale.
so if your playing the major pentatonic scale with the starting note on the 5th fret
you are playing an A major pentatonic.
i hope that helps. my theorys not too crash hot and i cant really remember much more about the pentatonice but that might clear things up
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#3
Quote by Metallica!
Okay have been trying to learn scales so I started with the major pentatonic (5 basic fingerings) and then I looked at one of the lessons on here and it shows the five basic fingerings but then it also shows the scales: A major Pentatonic, B major pentatonic C major pentatonic etc. and that got me even more confused, so can any one show me what the major pentatonic scale is and how to read/play it.

Thanks much appreciated.

You probably recognise this pattern:
E||----------------------5-7-||
B||------------------5-7-----||
G||--------------4-6---------||
D||----------4-7-------------||
A||------4-7-----------------||
E||--5-7---------------------||

It's the most common box shape of A major pentatonic. The other four shapes join onto it. We call this a major pentatonic because of the intervals it uses, and we say that the scale is in the key of A because that is the root note (the starting note, fifth fret on the low E string). Now, if you shift every note up two frets, the root note will be B and you'll get B major pentatonic. If you shift them up three frets, you'll get C major pentatonic (remember, B#/Cb are enharmonics of C and B respectively. Hopefully you read this before I edited it to say that).

Why this works: When you're working out a scale, you work out the intervals from the root note. In the case of a major pentatonic, you go up from the root note like this:

Whole step, Whole step, One and a half steps, Whole step (and then another step and a half brings you back up to the root note).

A pentatonic scale has five different notes (penta = five). These change depending on the scale (for A major pentatonic they are A, B, C#, E and F#; while for B major pentatonic they are B, C#, D#, F# and G#; etc). However, the intervals we use to work out the notes are always the same for the same type of scale. The scale shapes you learn go through the scale in two octaves. The box shapes are just a visual representation of these intervals.
Last edited by scrilly at Jan 29, 2007,
#4
Quote by scrilly
(remember, there is no such thing as B#/Cb).

There are.
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#5
Quote by elvenkindje
There are.

Well yes, but given that the guy doesn't know how to figure out what key he's playing in, the naming of enharmonics is probably the least of his worries right now.
#6
If your in A pentatonic Major... look at all the A notes ... move the whole lot up so the A's become B's... your now im B major ..and so on.. I just doesnt need to be more complicated than that..
#7
OMG! i get it! scrilly thank you so ****ing much! and thanks everyone else! i cant believe i didnt get it before