#1
Alright I've been doing some recordings lately and realized my tone is lacking. I run a PRS custom 24 into a Mesa Dual Rectifier head with standard 4*12 rectifier cab.

On the recordings the chords sounded really good but I couldn't come out with a good lead tone without cranking my master, which can't be good for my amp, and even then it was week. Lead stuff just doesnt have the fullness and scream it needs.

I got a lot of reccomendations from different people that has left me fairly confused.

First advice was to get higher output pickups. I plan on putting a Dimarzio Tonezone in the bridge but am not sure what will complement it well in the neck.

Also, I was advised by different people to get compression/sustainer, along with a noise suppressor, a digital delay, a seymour duncan pickup booster or mxr micro amp, etc.

I am willing to try any combination of these things but only hae so much money obviously so what combination of the above things or different things do you guys reccomend I look at to solve my tone woes?

Also, how does the tonezone compare with another high output dimarzio, like the Evolution, or the super distortion?

Thanks in advance to anyone who helps out.
Last edited by Anathaema at Jan 29, 2007,
#2
If you have a Custom 24, you have PRS HFS/Vintage Bass pickups. There's really no need to replace them. And you don't *need* effects to get a good tone from your setup. There's nothing wrong with cranking the master. A Dual Recto is an amp that wants to be played loud. If you want low volume fizziness, go buy yourself a Peavey XXX. Also, it's difficult to get your live tone from a recording setup. You should saturate your recording medium with sound. You shouldn't buy a 100 watt stack and try to play it quietly then wonder why your tone "lacks."
Hi, I'm Peter
#3
Your recorded tone is lacking, or just your tone from your amp is?

If you are talking about your recorded tone, you probably have scooped mids and too much gain. Put your ear right next to the speaker and get the tone you want there.

That and you should push your amp. Turn it up to 7 or 8.
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#4
i hear that dual recifiers plus OD pedal sound amazing for leads. the amp is supposedly a little flabby so the boost tightens things up. i dont think you need a pickup change since your PRS probably has pretty decent pickups in it already.
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#5
heh and here i was thinking my tone sucked with my line 6 + strat copy.. o well seems like you already have an amazing axe and amp, so i've just heard the tone really shines when you really push your amp, just like what everyone else said.
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#6
Quote by Dirk Gently
If you have a Custom 24, you have PRS HFS/Vintage Bass pickups. There's really no need to replace them. And you don't *need* effects to get a good tone from your setup. There's nothing wrong with cranking the master. A Dual Recto is an amp that wants to be played loud. If you want low volume fizziness, go buy yourself a Peavey XXX. Also, it's difficult to get your live tone from a recording setup. You should saturate your recording medium with sound. You shouldn't buy a 100 watt stack and try to play it quietly then wonder why your tone "lacks."


Trouble is recording at high volumes makes the speaker move too much. Thats why people suggested the pickup booster. Maybe an attenuator would work better though?

The delay and compression I guess were suggested just as stylistic improvements that should have been made.
#7
What do you mean "move too much?" Part of the idea of getting big, heavy tone is speaker excursion. Properly micing a halfstack is an art.
Hi, I'm Peter
#8
Quote by Dirk Gently
What do you mean "move too much?" Part of the idea of getting big, heavy tone is speaker excursion. Properly micing a halfstack is an art.

+1, speaker breakup is usually coveted in combination with poweramp OD. The only reason to get an attenuator is if you can't crank it that loud where you are recording. You will still lack the speaker movement though, which adds to the texture of the sound. And like Dirk said, depending on mic location and angle, it's almost like having an additional EQ.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#9
Thats nice to hear, when the engineer told me to turn down my amp cause the speaker moves too much I was kind of disgruntled. I guess I'll have to read up on micing cabs some more.
#10
I'm kind of in the same boat. I'm using a Dual Rectifier Roadster combo, and it's very difficult to get good lead tones at "bedroom volume" for any of the recording I'm doing. Can't really turn the thing up much louder than I've got it simply because, well.. You can already hear me from about a block away

I've found some pretty good solutions though, running two overdrive pedals in a row using the RAW setting works fantastic. I've tried Maxon OD-9/OD808, and the MXR Zakk Wylde pedal. Sounds great. Subtle echo adds a lot too, and at the expense of your dynamics, compression can do wonders. The only problem is it's like another $500+ on pedals to make an amp do at quiet volumes what it (should) do when cranked.

I'll find out more in a couple weeks whne I take it out for a gig, as I've only had it a short time and haven't had a whole lot of time to play with the insane amount of options it has.

Now for an odd question. Does anyone know if I have the effects loop turned on, turn down the send/recieve volume, but have the masters on all the channels and the overall volume cranked, will it make a difference? Obviously I'll be missing out on the speaker breakup, but will it put more signal through the tubes thus improving my sound, or will it just not make a damn bit of difference?