#1
I was so excited when I first got my bass 3 weeks ago I am trying to pick up speed and practice daily but, for some reason I think my finger are too short to get any faster. Are there any advise on what I should work on to develop speed?
#2
just keep practicing, motivation should be the rewards of your hardwork, and hardwork should lead to rewards, for it is said and thy shall be done
#3
You just have to keep plugging away. I know where you are. You'll feel yourself hit walla every once in a while, but then you will accelerate in your skill beyond what you thought possible for you. It's all just practice. It also helps to do a lot of reading. On UG, other websites, and even go to your local Barne's&Noble and read some of the books in the music section (you can read them as much as you want in the store).
#4
Thanks for you guys quick response, I feel like I am meeting some wonderful people in the bass world. One other question. Should I tune my guitar daily?
#5
Listen to bassists that are obscenely fast, guys like Billy Sheehan and Victor Wooten. That always gets me motivated.
#6
Quote by bassva
Should I tune my guitar daily?

Best to tune it at the start of every time you play.

I find listening to music all the time for basslines I want to have a go at keeps me pretty interested in bass. Definately learn to play all of your favourite songs and play along with the records.
#7
I tune my bass every few days, unless I can tell by ear it's bad, which I've gotten rather good at. But I rarely gig or use it outside my own home, so I don't have much concern if it's not perfectly in tune constantly. So sue me.

Every once in a while you'll hit a dead end, and it'll feel like you can't get out, but keep practising and you'll get out of it. Remember as you pay your hands will also physically grow and strengthen, so it'll help you out, but just remember that if you keep working on something you'll get it.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#8
Ok, I tune my bass each time before I play. I have a pretty sensitive ear and can hear when its going slightly out of tune--to me its like nails on a chalkboard.

Set yourself up a practice schedule and make sure you put enough variety in it as to not get bored or frustrated. As far as strengthening your hands, learning your scales / modes up and down the fret board. Starting at a slow speed and building up will improve your hand strength your flexibility and your speed, and set some solid foundation in theory for learning bass lines and improvising. (If you haven't already, get yourself a metronome.) If your hands are small, make sure you don't avoid using your pinky. Its a common issue with us bassist with smaller hands.

Set yourself some attainable goals, like learning a song all of the way through in a set period of time. If you can, find yourself a good teacher; its amazing how a good instructor can motivate you to succeed beyond what you think is your personal best.

And smb is right, listen to all sorts of music to find inspiration. And if you can afford it, go out and soak up as much live music as possible.

And keep practicing. One day, its all going to fall in to place and you'll be amazed.
#9
Quote by anarkee
Ok, I tune my bass each time before I play. I have a pretty sensitive ear and can hear when its going slightly out of tune--to me its like nails on a chalkboard.

Set yourself up a practice schedule and make sure you put enough variety in it as to not get bored or frustrated. As far as strengthening your hands, learning your scales / modes up and down the fret board. Starting at a slow speed and building up will improve your hand strength your flexibility and your speed, and set some solid foundation in theory for learning bass lines and improvising. (If you haven't already, get yourself a metronome.) If your hands are small, make sure you don't avoid using your pinky. Its a common issue with us bassist with smaller hands.

Set yourself some attainable goals, like learning a song all of the way through in a set period of time. If you can, find yourself a good teacher; its amazing how a good instructor can motivate you to succeed beyond what you think is your personal best.

And smb is right, listen to all sorts of music to find inspiration. And if you can afford it, go out and soak up as much live music as possible.

And keep practicing. One day, its all going to fall in to place and you'll be
amazed.


Set yourself some attainable goals, like learning a song all of the way through


This is one I never thought of. I like this idea and thanks for all advise
#10
yea, learning an entire song can be feel pretty rewarding afterwards, start out with some easy stuff, like Make You Feel Better by the chillis, it's simple enough and has a nice easy bass solo just try and increase the difficulty of the stuff you play as time goes on, you'll find that you improve noticeably.
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