#1
Hey guys im away at college and it sucks only having my acoustic most of the year. Id like to bring an electric but bringing my amp is whats stopping me .

So ive been wondering what some decent programs there are that would allow me to play my guitar through my laptop. The cheaper the better. I already have a decent set of speakers with a woofer here at school.

Also what kind of cables/other hardware would i need to plug it into my laptops mic.

I tried searching and couldnt find what i was looking for.
thanks
NEW GEAR:
Ibanez RG7420
Schecter CSH-1 Semi Hollowbody- W/ Duncans
Roland Microcube
B52 AT112 60 watt
Monster Cables

STOLEN:
Deluxe Double Fat Strat- Pewter
Gibson SG- w/ SD Invader
Line 6 Flextone II w/floorboard
#2
That whole laptop thing seems like it would be more of a hassle, and kindof expensive. You could get one of those roland micro-cubes there really small but there good to just kinda putz around on cause they have alot of features.

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Gear:
Vantage Mystery model Electric Guitar
Peavy TNT 115 Mid 80's model USA
Russian Big Muff
Ibanez 5 string
#3
agreed. Just find yourself a mini amp. Some of them are even small enough to easilly fit inside of a back pack if that's what you're worried about.
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#4
I love my little Roland Cube 15. Cheap, effective, and sounds pretty decent.

Complete with headphone/line-out input ( for those 3am practices)
Gear:
Charvel/Jackson 3B Bass
Jackson CMG Bass
Ibanez BTB575FM 5-String Bass
Vintage 70s Ampeg V9 SVT/ Ampeg 8x10 Cab
Fender Deluxe Blackout Telecaster

Angelus Mortem
#5
I hope you know that if you play your guitar through your laptop speakers, when you play loud enough, it can cause the laptop itself to literally explode.

Good luck trying.
#7
Both Guitar Rig and Amplitube are pretty nice. You'll need a decent sound card with ASIO support though, or be prepared to meet Mr. Latency. I've used the Sound Blaster Audigy2 ZS with both Guitar Rig and Amplitube, and it works great. USB soundcards are also plentiful and reasonably cheap.

For connecting your guitar, you need just a regular guitar cable, and a 1/4" to 1/8" converter (if the soundcard doesn't have a 1/4" input).

I'd definately suggest the decent-soundcard-and-modelling-software approach, provided it's within your budget. Both Guitar Rig and Amplitube should have demos available so you can see which you like better. If you have decent speakers, this combination definately beats Microcube and the other tiny practice amps out there sound-wise, plus you have way more possibilities for tweaking your sound (effect, amp, cab and mic models) and much more flexible recording options (recording wet, recording dry and re-amping, routing through plugins, etc).

Another option would be a Line6 Toneport or GuitarPort, which both come with the Gearbox modelling software. Right now I have the Toneport UX2 myself, and it's an awesome tool for both practising and home recording.
Last edited by indrek13 at Jan 30, 2007,
#8
Here is what I use for playing through my computer.

Korg PX4D Guitar/Bass Effects Box

Guitar into Korg > Korg into Mic input. It has tons of AMP simulations and effects, with 100 presets...

This run me about $230CDN.

Here's a link:
http://www.korg.com/gear/info.asp?A_PROD_NO=PX4D&category_id=6

Perfect setup for recording or playing through your computer speakers... Hell, it's a home studio. Play and record, or hookup to your amp with tons of options.

EDIT: You can pick one up for about $170CDN!
http://www.activemusician.com/item--EM.KRG-PX4D
Last edited by DimebagDaner at Jan 30, 2007,
#9
Looks like you have a Digitech RP-80. Why not just use headphones with that? No purchase necessary.
#10
If you want something really small, buy a Marshall MS-2 or MS-4. Tnhey're awesome litter amps for little needs. Or you could take a set off headphones, and one of your distortion pedals, and plug your guitar into it then use your headphones for the output slot.
#11
I just brought the amp, were not supposed to have one, but as long as you don't piss off the RA's then your good.
A guitar is your personality expressed through 6 strings.
#12
In my experience, unless you have a special sound card or some type of guitar interface, you won't want to just plug it into your computer, even if you have good amp simulation software. The computer needs to turn the analog guitar signal into a digital signal before you hear it. That means there is a delay between what you play and what you hear, between 1/2 and 1 second delay, which is very difficult play with and annoying.

If you want to use your computer get a line 6 guitar port or some similar interface. But I think you're better off using your digitech with headphones or some similar multi-effects pedal, they sound good and you can still turn it all the way up without bothering anyone.
#13
if you want distortion, then this is what you can do... Buy a DS-1, and two regular chords, and then buy a 1/4th to 1/8th converter so it would be...
Guitar <-------->DS-1 with 1/4th to 1/8th converter in the output<-----Computer Speakers(1/8th male)
or
Guitar <-------->DS-1<-------->1/4th to 1/8th converter plug into micrphone slot or line in.


(all the <------>'s are cords.)
Last edited by GuitarEvan07 at Jan 30, 2007,
#14
Honestly, for the price the Korg PXD4 is worth it. You can bring that box and a couple patch cords with a 1/4" to 1/8" adapter anywhere and plug into almost anything with speakers. It has TONS of options and also is very compact and simple to navigate.

I get outstanding sound quality running Guitar<1/4>Korg PXD4<1/4 to 1/8>Computer Mic Input(Record or just through to speakers).

If you want a sample, just let me know.
#16
Quote by lechero
In my experience, unless you have a special sound card or some type of guitar interface, you won't want to just plug it into your computer, even if you have good amp simulation software. The computer needs to turn the analog guitar signal into a digital signal before you hear it. That means there is a delay between what you play and what you hear, between 1/2 and 1 second delay, which is very difficult play with and annoying.

Just to clarify, converting the signal from analog to digital is not going to take a whole second. The problem with regular sound cards is that they use your operating system's sound interface. So the sound has to travel from the sound card's A/D converter to the sound card driver to the operating system to the modelling software, then back to the operating system, then to the sound card driver, then to the sound card's D/A converter and finally to your speakers or headphones. The operating system is the bottleneck here. ASIO, which I also mentioned in my previous post, allows the modelling or recording software to communicate directly with the sound card, thus skipping the operating system entirely. This allows for latency around a couple of milliseconds, which for all practical purposes is nonexistent.

Now that I think of it, there's a driver called asio4all which brings ASIO support to consumer sound cards. A few friends of mine have tried it with their integrated sound cards, and it's working great with Amplitube. Your mileage may vary, obviously.

Just tossing another option into the ring.
#17
wow guys thanks for all the responses. I think a mini amp might be out of the question only because of the $$$ which i dont have at college lol.

indrek13- Thanks you anwsered my question pretty damn well. I think with my sound card it may be a pretty crappy option so i think ill keep my guitar away from the laptop until i upgrade to a more powerful computer.

Quote by rwd5k
Looks like you have a Digitech RP-80. Why not just use headphones with that? No purchase necessary.


wait my RP works without an amp? Ive never tried that. hmmm i wonder if i could plug my speaker system into that with some decent results. its a 60 watt system. Anyone know?


Quote by DimebagDaner
Honestly, for the price the Korg PXD4 is worth it. You can bring that box and a couple patch cords with a 1/4" to 1/8" adapter anywhere and plug into almost anything with speakers. It has TONS of options and also is very compact and simple to navigate.
I get outstanding sound quality running Guitar<1/4>Korg PXD4<1/4 to 1/8>Computer Mic Input(Record or just through to speakers).

If you want a sample, just let me know.


sounds a lot like my RP80 pedal tho with less effects. im sending you a PM for sample. id like to hear the quality anyways. thanks


Quote by Nick_
Buy an acoustic



!


I already have one bro and thats the problem. I have a shitty acoustic and its killing my motivation to play. When I have an electric i feel so much more satisfied and can keep playing and playing. With my acoustic the tone sucks and i lose interest after about an hour or so.


I appreciate the help guys
NEW GEAR:
Ibanez RG7420
Schecter CSH-1 Semi Hollowbody- W/ Duncans
Roland Microcube
B52 AT112 60 watt
Monster Cables

STOLEN:
Deluxe Double Fat Strat- Pewter
Gibson SG- w/ SD Invader
Line 6 Flextone II w/floorboard
#18
um....behringer makes a guitar with a built in USB port...its made especially to play thru your computer and it comes with its own software...just a thought
#19
^ not worth it. I don't see why the hell you want to do that. unless they include a new soundcard too.