#1
Can anybody tell me what the best way to determine a time signatire would be? I know the basics, but want to know more of the advanced stuff.
#2
There have been quite good time sig lessons in the more recent Guitar Techniques magazines but it still confuses me a little too.

I usually take a slightly educated guess. If there are 6 notes in a run it's usually 3/4, if there are 7 notes then it's usually 7/8. Once there are 9 or more notes though it starts to mess with my mind.

Hopefully someone in MT will be able to help you out a little better. They're (quite) smart.
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#5
everything you need is in the time signatue ie 4/4. written on a peice of music.
the top mumber indicates how many beats in the bar, the bottom number indicates the type of note as main beat

example

4/1 4 semibreves in the bar. 3/2 3 minims in the bar 4/4 4 crotchets in the bar

9/8 9 quavers in the bar

hope that helps if not look up time values of notes in standard music notation
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#6
Quote by fleaflicker182
Figuring out how many beats is easy. The hard part is getting the note value right. Anybody know how to do that?

I imagine each note as like a quaver or a semi-quaver

And then tap that beat and see where each note is played
#8
Quote by trigs
everything you need is in the time signatue ie 4/4. written on a peice of music. The top mumber indicates how many beats in the bar, the bottom number indicates the type of note as main beat.
I'm not picking on you, trigs, because this comes up over and over and over again, and you're just the latest perpetrator of this half-truth. Your explanation works only when discussing Simple time. Your statement is false when describing Compound time.

Please, please, please guys, learn the difference so that you can talk and play like a professional. If you don't know the differences between simple and compound time, I encourage you to take this Time Signature Lesson.

Good luck, and have a great night.
gpb
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- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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#9
Quote by gpb0216
I'm not picking on you, trigs, because this comes up over and over and over again, and you're just the latest perpetrator of this half-truth. Your explanation works only when discussing Simple time. Your statement is false when describing Compound time.

Please, please, please guys, learn the difference so that you can talk and play like a professional. If you don't know the differences between simple and compound time, I encourage you to take this Time Signature Lesson.

Good luck, and have a great night.
gpb

I don't see how he is wrong, thats the very same thing I was told in my theory lessons

4/4 = Four crotchet notes per bar

3/4 = Three crotchet notes per bar

Whats wrong with that?
#10
That reasoning is still effective to a point, but it doesn't describe where the pulse is

Compound time has the pulse placed differently, while polymeters vary depending on the song.
#11
Quote by Nick_
That reasoning is still effective to a point, but it doesn't describe where the pulse is

Compound time has the pulse placed differently, while polymeters vary depending on the song.

I don't get what you mean

If by the pulse you mean the beat, I think it shows it fine

4/4 = 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

3/4 = 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3

I can only assume there is something I am mis-understanding here
#12
6/8 - 1 2 3 4 5 6 (Compund time)
3/4 - 1 & 2 & 3 & (Simple Time)

etc.

Plus take 7/8, or other polymeters -you could do 1212123, or 1231212, etc.
#13
Quote by Nick_
6/8 - 1 2 3 4 5 6 (Compund time)
3/4 - 1 & 2 & 3 & (Simple Time)

etc.

Plus take 7/8, or other polymeters -you could do 1212123, or 1231212, etc.

Ok, i've got you

edit: Wait, how can 3/4 be simple time?
#14
1,2,3,4 / 2 or 4 is simple time - pulsed 1 & 2 & ....

3,6,9,12 / 8 or 16 is compound time pulsed 1 2 3 1 2 3

anything else is polymeter, made by "combining" "1 &"s and "1 2 3"s
#15
Quote by GiantRaven
Wait, how can 3/4 be simple time?
The quarter note gets the beat. Think about "Macin Depression" by Hendrix. The song certainly doesn't feel like 6/8. You feel the three quarter notes.


Remember, a time signature is NOT a fraction.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The quarter note gets the beat. Think about "Macin Depression" by Hendrix. The song certainly doesn't feel like 6/8. You feel the three quarter notes.


Remember, a time signature is NOT a fraction.

But how does that make it simple time?

My understanding was that simple time, you could divide into two parts

And compound time you can divide into three
#17
Quote by GiantRaven
But how does that make it simple time?

My understanding was that simple time, you could divide into two parts

And compound time you can divide into three
Are you talking about this?

"In simple time the upper number directly indicates the number of beats per measure. These beats naturally divide into two equal parts.

In compound time you divide the upper number by 3 to determine the number of beats per measure. These beats naturally divide into three equal parts."

He means that, in ST, you can divide each beat into eighth notes. In 3/4, you could have 6 8th notes, they would just be felt as 1-& 2-& 3-&. In CT, each beat is divided into 3 notes. That same barre would be felt as 1-trip-let 2-trip-let. In both bases, the downbeat falls on the numbers.
#18
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Are you talking about this?

"In simple time the upper number directly indicates the number of beats per measure. These beats naturally divide into two equal parts.

In compound time you divide the upper number by 3 to determine the number of beats per measure. These beats naturally divide into three equal parts."

He means that, in ST, you can divide each beat into eighth notes. In 3/4, you could have 6 8th notes, they would just be felt as 1-& 2-& 3-&. In CT, each beat is divided into 3 notes. That same barre would be felt as 1-trip-let 2-trip-let. In both bases, the downbeat falls on the numbers.



Yeah, that's right... It's like in this song I'm playing in band.. Every other measure you switch time signatures between 6/8 and 3/4.. So it's really obvious to me.. lol... 123 456, 1 2 3, 123 456. DUnno if that helps any. lol Probably not
#20
^ i think he means its in 6/8 but every other bar he only gets 1/2 a bar, so it kinda feels like 3/4, in something like that i would tie the 2 together and call it 9/8 since the measure repeats after the "3/4" which from what i understand would be compound time (if i'm wrong please don't massacre me, and feel free to correct me as i'm here to learn as well but i'm more into the notation theory than the rhythmic theory)
#21
Quote by z4twenny
^ i think he means its in 6/8 but every other bar he only gets 1/2 a bar, so it kinda feels like 3/4, in something like that i would tie the 2 together and call it 9/8 since the measure repeats after the "3/4" which from what i understand would be compound time (if i'm wrong please don't massacre me, and feel free to correct me as i'm here to learn as well but i'm more into the notation theory than the rhythmic theory)
Then it wouldn't be 9/8; it would be 12/8, sort of.

You could switch between 6/8 and 3/4, but it would be quite hard to switch the feel and accect the right notes and not screw up as a band Ithis will be especially hard for a drummer, though to be fair, most things are ).
#22
it can be hard to differenciate between 6/8 and 3/4 sometimes, especially when you are just guessing and not looking at the sheet music where the measures are spelled out for you. Often times things with a 6-ish feel are written out in 3/4.
#23
If you know basic shit of how long a note lasts then time signature should be easy.

Like 4/4 is 4 beats in a measure right? Well 5/4 would be the same just 5 beats in one measure.

And 4s are quarter notes. So it means 4 or 5 quarter notes in ONE measure.

If it says something weird like 11/8, it means 11 8th notes in ONE measure. Its pretty simple.

To sum it all up all it means is that the number on top is how many and the number on the bottom is the length. Like quarter, 8th, and 16th notes.

Hope that helped
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#24
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Are you talking about this?

"In simple time the upper number directly indicates the number of beats per measure. These beats naturally divide into two equal parts.

In compound time you divide the upper number by 3 to determine the number of beats per measure. These beats naturally divide into three equal parts."

He means that, in ST, you can divide each beat into eighth notes. In 3/4, you could have 6 8th notes, they would just be felt as 1-& 2-& 3-&. In CT, each beat is divided into 3 notes. That same barre would be felt as 1-trip-let 2-trip-let. In both bases, the downbeat falls on the numbers.

I sort of follow

Thanks for your help
#25
Quote by crash 2.0
If you know basic shit of how long a note lasts then time signature should be easy.

Like 4/4 is 4 beats in a measure right? Well 5/4 would be the same just 5 beats in one measure.

And 4s are quarter notes. So it means 4 or 5 quarter notes in ONE measure.

If it says something weird like 11/8, it means 11 8th notes in ONE measure. Its pretty simple.

To sum it all up all it means is that the number on top is how many and the number on the bottom is the length. Like quarter, 8th, and 16th notes.

Hope that helped
This is all true, but misleading. With your reasoning, 6/8 would appear to be the same as 3/4. While you could write the riff in a measure of meter, the accents would be quite different.

Please read Gpb's lesson if you do not follow.
#26
Oh snap. I forgot about the accents. I dont know much about em either. Thanks dude!
Ballz On Parade
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#27
Just fyi, alternating bars of 3/4 and 6/8 is rather common, is known as a hemeola, and is the base of many flamenco compas (rhythms)

also technically 3/4 COULD be compound time but it isn't usually considered as such
#28
Quote by GiantRaven
I don't see how he is wrong, thats the very same thing I was told in my theory lessons

4/4 = Four crotchet notes per bar

3/4 = Three crotchet notes per bar

Whats wrong with that?
Nothing, because these are both examples of simple time.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
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#29
Quote by CowboyUp
it can be hard to differenciate between 6/8 and 3/4 sometimes, especially when you are just guessing and not looking at the sheet music where the measures are spelled out for you. Often times things with a 6-ish feel are written out in 3/4.
They shouldn't be. 3/4 is felt as three beats per measure; 6/8 is felt as two beats per measure.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.