#2
fast action is where the strings are really close to the neck so you can move your fretting hand faster up and down the strings, and slow is the opposite....fast action is also low action and slow action is also high action
#4
well, your hands may be moving the same speed, but you have to push your fingers further to fret the notes, slowing you down slightly. One of my basses has a crazily low action (the neck is basically dead level!) which makes tapping so much easier, wheras the fretless has a relatively high action.
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#5
Remember guys, you get better tone with a higher action. It's a balancing act between tone and playability
#6
^aye, but not 'look mum i can stand between my E string and the fretboard' action
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#7
my cheapo-fretless had very little articulation or mid-range until I just read here that higher action = better tone. I raised it by about an extra centimeter or two and now its fairly growly.
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#8
Quote by Applehead
Remember guys, you get better tone with a higher action. It's a balancing act between tone and playability


But remember Applehead that the further away from the neck the string is, the further off you are going to be from the correct note.
#10
My Actions in very high and i like it that way
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#11
On my previous bass the action was stupidly high (too high to tap or slap correctly), and I hated it. The tone was okay, but on my newer bass with a much lower action I prefer the tone, and can finally slap and pop, something I could never do on my old one.

I'd never heard of it being called slow and fast action before though, only high and low.
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#12
Quote by elemenohpee
But remember Applehead that the further away from the neck the string is, the further off you are going to be from the correct note.

That's why you adjust your intonation after you adjust the action.
#14
Quote by Dinkydaisy
On my previous bass the action was stupidly high (too high to tap or slap correctly), and I hated it. The tone was okay, but on my newer bass with a much lower action I prefer the tone, and can finally slap and pop, something I could never do on my old one.

I'd never heard of it being called slow and fast action before though, only high and low.


Did you have an Epi/Gibson by any chance as your old bass? Yes, I saw the same issue when I went from the Epi to the Ibanez last month. It was like someone lifted a roadblock out of the way. But I will say the high action on my first bass gave me a left hand of steel
#15
Quote by FbSa
How do you do that exactly, I changed my action, now my intonation starting to go wack in the higher fretage. That's right, I said fretage.

Instead of moving the "saddles" (whatever the hell you call 'em) that hold the string at the bridge up and down, move them farther away or closer so that you get the right pitch at each fretted note (make sure you do it with a perfectly tuned string or you will be confused).
#16
Quote by kmbuchamushroom
Instead of moving the "saddles" (whatever the hell you call 'em) that hold the string at the bridge up and down, move them farther away or closer so that you get the right pitch at each fretted note (make sure you do it with a perfectly tuned string or you will be confused).


Too bad that's not possible with equal temperament. The higher frets (after the 12th-14th, I believe) are never perfectly in-tune with each other on a fretted bass due to the concept of equal temperament. The closest you'll get it is within a few cents sharp or flat of the right note. I'm not sure if this applies to an unlined fretless bass as well, but a lined fretless definitely has this concept too.

To adjust your intonation, like kmbuchamushroom said, move the saddles horizontally (towards or away from the neck).
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#17
Quote by vashts80
To adjust your intonation, like kmbuchamushroom said, move the saddles horizontally (towards or away from the neck).


Make sure your using a great tuner, preferably Korg, and remember, Boss pedal tuners really aren't that great :]

The open string should be exactly the same pitch as the 12 fretted note [octave up] as well as the 12th fret harmonic.

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#18
i set the action on mine really high once and it sounded awesome when i used a pick but was hard to play finger style..
#19
Sorry if this sounds dumb but I am dumb to but how do you change the action and what is intonation

(Please dont rip my head off )