#1
The lead guitarist in my band has asked me to write some solos, and Id have no trouble with that if I had keys to base my solos on, but alot of our stuff is a-tonal. Can anyone recommend some tricks or paterns I could use to improve my a-tonal solo writing? thanks.
#3
Do you listen to Nevermore? If not, do so.

still a lot of the stuff they're playing is either melodic or harmonic minor.
ಥ_ಥ
#4
If it's atonal, just find a few notes you like and make up your own scales. Try using wholetone scales, half-whole, or whole-half, chromatics, diminished, all kinds of fun stuff.
#5
Quote by 79stratSTONES
i dont know but "tunings" is spelled wrong on your sig. only one n.

Oooops, thanks. And yes I do listen to nevermore, so no one has anything helpful to answer my question?
#6
A-tonal as in not based in particular keys? If so then just look at the notes you are using in each measure and find a mode that best particularly complements it. Just feel it out...if it sounds good then go with it. You could also harmonize at particular intervals.
#7
i dout its complety antonal theres proberly some key you can base you solos off
#8
It's not atonal.

There's going to be some strong key pull, it just may not be obvious


unless you're actual a theory major and expert in 12-tone row etc and will make me look stupid
#9
If it's atonal, the best thing to do, IMO, is to base your solos on the chord progression underneath.
#10
the easieset option is to go crazy on the whammy bar. Other than that, do what the other people said, try making ur scale out of only the notes in the riff and the notes a fourth higher
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#11
Quote by Scourge441
If it's atonal, the best thing to do, IMO, is to base your solos on the chord progression underneath.


Atonality would mean it wouldn't have a chord progression
#12
Can someone give a definition of A-tonal?
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#13
It has no tonality

to truly be atonal it would basically be computer-generated noise that constantly avoids any sense of pitch

"pantonal" is the proper term to refer to such movements as serialism etc, where they avoid key centres at all costs - you have to use all tqwelve tones before repeating one plus a whole lot of other rules, controlled use of consonance, stuff like that

It basically sounds like random notes to the untrained ear but a lot of work goes into it
#14
If its atonal, then the whole point would be to avoid scales and chord tones. Atonal means there is no tonal center, no pull towards any single note at any particular time.
#15
chromatic randomness would work best in this case.
Read my post. Not this.
#16
Quote by Nick_
It's not atonal.

There's going to be some strong key pull, it just may not be obvious


unless you're actual a theory major and expert in 12-tone row etc and will make me look stupid

It is completly a-tonal in alot of them. And no I would never use the tone row, it's ****ing rediculous.

Quote by huk
If its atonal, then the whole point would be to avoid scales and chord tones. Atonal means there is no tonal center, no pull towards any single note at any particular time.
Exactly, thankyou thats what i've been trying to say. But my question was what do I play over the riffs?
#17
What you can do is come up with your own symmetrical scales. One technique that I learned of recently was to superimpose two triads on top of each other to make a 6-note scale that really doesn't gravitate towards one single note.
For example, take an A major triad (A-C#-E) and an Eb major triad(Eb-G-Bb) and combine them to make a scale consisting of A-Bb-C#-Eb-E-G. The reason I chose A and Eb was because they are a tritone apart from each other. Try experimenting with different intervallic patterns, or even combining three triads on top of each other.
Your ultimate goal (besides making good music) should be to eventually incorporate all 12 notes into your playing. It may seem like a daunting task at first, but just keep chipping away at the corners and you'll have it eventually.
#18
Quote by Nick_
It's not atonal.

There's going to be some strong key pull, it just may not be obvious


unless you're actual a theory major and expert in 12-tone row etc and will make me look stupid


I agree... For the most part atonal means that the progression doesn't follow the standards set by Fuchs, Bach, Mozart, on up until the late 1800's...

Atonal can mean a lot of things nowadays.
#19
Quote by titopuente
What you can do is come up with your own symmetrical scales. One technique that I learned of recently was to superimpose two triads on top of each other to make a 6-note scale that really doesn't gravitate towards one single note.
For example, take an A major triad (A-C#-E) and an Eb major triad(Eb-G-Bb) and combine them to make a scale consisting of A-Bb-C#-Eb-E-G. The reason I chose A and Eb was because they are a tritone apart from each other. Try experimenting with different intervallic patterns, or even combining three triads on top of each other.
Your ultimate goal (besides making good music) should be to eventually incorporate all 12 notes into your playing. It may seem like a daunting task at first, but just keep chipping away at the corners and you'll have it eventually.

I really can't express how much I love you right, thats exactly what I needed, your a genius. Thanks heaps
#20
i do this when i am soloing in an atonal progression.

think of each chord as potentially requiring a different scale.

if your rhythm is playing a certain chord, play a consonant scale for that chord or the arppegio of the chord.

lets say the random chord progression is

Am7 / / / B9 / / / E7b5 / / / GMaj9 / / / F#sus2 / / / Ddim7 / / / Em / / /

Then play scales that have the same tone degrees as the chord,
e.g. Am7 has A, C, E, & G notes, the 1, b3, 5, and b7. Dorian, Phrygian and, Aeolian scales all have those degrees so pick one of those.

Am7 - A Dorian, A Phrygian, A Aeolian
B9 - B Mixolydian, B Hindu, B Lydian Dominant
E7b5 - E Lydian Dominant, E Hungarian Major, E Major Locrian
GMaj9 - G Ionian, G Lydian, G Double Harmonic
F#sus2 - F# Hungarian Minor, F# Bebop Dominant, F# Kumoi
Ddim7 - D Locrian M6, D Whole-Half, D Half Whole
Em - E Melodic Minor, E Neapolitan Major, E Augmented
#21
Atonal by definition won't have a chord progression

also your random chords are all built on roots from the G major scale so tbqh they're basically substitutions and you could analyze them into submission

what I'm saying that is unless he follows very strict guidelines and devotes most of his time to consciously avoiding any traditional forms at all it's not atonal and he can probably find a way to use theory on it


I say just wing it by ear though
#22
why dont you tab out an example for us?
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