#1
I've got a chord progression that goes A///D///F#m///E///. I was just using A major over the whole lot but i was wondering whether i could do it better another way?
Quote by marsvoltaguy
i say both. you always have the option to not use the pedal at all but it will still be there like that obsessed chick you took to homecoming and never called again, sitting there waiting for your call. so yea both
#3
E would work as well...
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#4
Quote by GenmathePanda
Try it in F#m... that'd be 1337.


Thats the other thing i've been doing, it was pretty 1337 *cough knob cough*
Quote by marsvoltaguy
i say both. you always have the option to not use the pedal at all but it will still be there like that obsessed chick you took to homecoming and never called again, sitting there waiting for your call. so yea both
#5
E mixolydian so it remains with the feel that it wants to go for more.
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#6
try F# harmonic minor
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#7
Quote by METSOAD
try F# harmonic minor



that would make the E and E# -_-;;

do you really want a minor second in a song that doesnt even begin or end with F#m? that's gonna sound really dissonant and will augment your A chord, conflict w/ your E, and make a weird minor/major effect w/ your F#m

well...unless u want that.
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#8
I think you should use this thread only for ideas. Try everything. Experiment. Its the only way you will grow. Listen to the Prgoression with a fresh mind, observe what emotion it evokes, then concentrate and express it. Use different scales, try everything. Its like painting a picture.
Quote by hendo123456789
invincibleneo - you are one of the only people in this thread that talk sense.
#10
I was just looking over it quickly and sometimes it takes me awhile to work things out without paper, but wouldnt D major or some D Pentatonic work?

I II III IV V VI VII
Dmaj Em F#m Gmaj Amaj Bm C#dim

The E chord is the only one that doesnt fit
E minor = E G B (if I am not mistaken, like i said I suck at this in my head)

D major = D E F# G A B C#

If some notes dont sit nicely against that E major chord just tweak the scale when you go over it.
#11
Quote by thepagesaretorn
E mixolydian so it remains with the feel that it wants to go for more.


Well, really for all intents and purposes, using E Mixolydian is the same as using A
Major.

That progression is totally A Major. That's the scale that will give you a consistent
tonal center for all those chords. You can get a bit bluesy by adding in a b3 to the
A major scale.
#12
Quote by edg
Well, really for all intents and purposes, using E Mixolydian is the same as using A
Major.

That progression is totally A Major. That's the scale that will give you a consistent
tonal center for all those chords. You can get a bit bluesy by adding in a b3 to the
A major scale.


no because putting the tonal center around E and not A makes the four bars end with an incompleteness. E Mixolydian is different because u dont treat the A as a tonic.

and adding a flat 3rd might just make it dissonant. try recording yourself strumming A major a few times and make sure all the notes are clear. then play against it playing the flat 3rd. even if you're using it as a non-harmonic tone, it's gonna sound way different than just something that's normally considered for tension

if u want to make it bluesy, try an A lydian. it'll raise the fourth and give that tritone a chance to shine, making it become a bright and falling sound like lydian is.

edit: just make sure not to play that fourth over the second chord as it could lead to weirdness. a minor second on a major chord is gonna sound a bit off.
My Gear:

82 Gibson Explorer
Ibanez '03 JEM7VWH

Greg Byers '01 Classical (Euro Spruce bent top)
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Alhambra 4P
Taylor 614ce
Framus Texan se. # 5/196

Diezel Herbert 2007
Mesa Recto 2x12
Last edited by thepagesaretorn at Feb 3, 2007,
#13
^

The minor 3rd over a major is essentially the essence of the blues sound. It works
quite well to make anything sound bluesy as long as you don't sit on it (use as
a lead note to the 2 or 3).

While the #4 is in the "blues scale", I'd consider it more of an optional blues note.
To me it doesn't suggest blues as much as the b3.

When you get down to it, you can use any note you want in a progression. It all
depends how you want it to sound and how skilled you are at it.