#1
I want to set up a pretty nice Pro Tools recording station in my room and I was needing some help on the equipment to get. I have an Apple Macbook Pro to record into and i'm getting an Mbox that comes with Pro Tools. When I record guitar I am going to use two microphones on it, one up close to capture the sound directly and one out a little in front of it to capture the room sound.

Do you think that these choices are equipment are good enough to get a good quality sound? I am looking to do as little mastering as possible, but since I went to school for 12 months to be a sound enginer I can master greatly, it's just so time consuming.

My birthday is comig up and I usually get around 200 bucks from relatives and stuff and I have a part time job so I have enough money to get stuff as long as it stays under $3,000.

Mbox 2 w/ Pro Tools

Shure SM57 Condenser Microphone (up close to guitar)

Neumann TLM 103 (picking up room sound)

I think I may need to get a better condenser for the up close.

This stuff is going for my little home studio to start out recording local bands for actual albums, since I can master, and for demos and stuff like that. I also need help picking out a bigger interface/mixer that works with Pro Tools so I can have enough ports to plug all the drum microphones into it.

Thanks for the help in advanced!
#3
You went to school for 12 months to be a sound engineer and you're asking us? And quite basic questions at that...I smell bullshit
#4
i think these are great choice if your just recording for yourself. However if your going to use this equipment to record for bands you might want to consider an interface with more outputs such as the m-audio project mix I/O. but unless you like recording two channels at a time, hey to each his own. but you might want to check to see if your computer has the specs to handle all that recording (e.g. more ram, bigger hard drive) because it would a waste if your computer can't handle your recording sequencer. but if your like me, i quit buying hardware and just went with software plug ins, you know less clutter. you might want to pick up a decent mic pre amps because i dont think that the mbox2 pre amps are as good as the original mbox
#5
Quote by ParanoiaMusic
You went to school for 12 months to be a sound engineer and you're asking us? And quite basic questions at that...I smell bullshit


I didn't do any recording for myself before hand and when your working in top of the line facilities with huge mixing tables, doesn't really make you better than anyone else at picking out a piece of equipment. I am looking for feedback maybe someone here has used them, those MF reviews are so unreliable.

I'm not saying, here tell me what I need to record, I just need to know if anyone has suggestions or just possibly answer the questions I have.

Never have I claimed to be the recording master.

Also I have already looked into specs, and my laptop can handle it.
#6
I owned an MBox2 and sold it - If you are planning on recording full bands I'd suggest saving up for one of the bigger interfaces.
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#7
Believe it or not, there are a few really good books out there about this. I am in the middle of reading "PC Recording Studios for Dummies" and it is really good. The author describes everything in "ProTools" terms. I have cubase so it doesn't help as much as I would like but I think it would be excellent for you. I think amazon.com has it for like 20 bucks......a worthwhile investment if you are going to be spending that type of cash. I also have "Home Recording Studios for Dummies" that I haven't read yet. Same author but it goes over hardware in greater detail.
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#8
Quote by Macbethstx
I almost forgot about recording vocals! I think i'm going to save up a little more so I can get this vocal microphone and get a better condenser for the microphone that is right next to the amp.


I actually think that your first choice was right on the money. The SM-57 is an excellent mic because it can do almost everything and it virtually never breaks with normal use. It's an excellent "alternative" mic for large background vocals because it imparts a certain character that allow more takes to work together. And the Neumann TLM 103 is good enough for recording lead vocals.

Quote by jtll24
you might want to pick up a decent mic pre amps because i dont think that the mbox2 pre amps are as good as the original mbox


Agreed, the Focusrite preamps in the original MBox were excellent for the price and the new ones can't quite compare. I also agree that an interface with more inputs would be useful for band situations (drums) since you don't really want to do a mixer -> stereo mix -> MBox mixdown during recording, that leaves too few choices for the real mix.