#1
How do you make proper key changes in a song? Im not sure how to do it and make it sound good. I guess in some cases you can instantly switch over if u introduce a new riff or something. But, my guess as to do it right would be sorta do it slowly like play chords that have notes in both keys than switch the key? Is what I said legit? How about some ideas and ways to change keys and doing it well.

Is the trick of changing keys, doing it so you hardly notice it? Or do u want people to notice? Like isn't the point f key changes to get the audiences focused after aboring part or w/e? If its hardly noticable how does it catch the audiences attention again?
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#2
You should change the key of a song by using chords that are in both keys.
#3
Quote by Devon8822
How do you make proper key changes in a song? Im not sure how to do it and make it sound good. I guess in some cases you can instantly switch over if u introduce a new riff or something. But, my guess as to do it right would be sorta do it slowly like play chords that have notes in both keys than switch the key? Is what I said legit? How about some ideas and ways to change keys and doing it well.

Is the trick of changing keys, doing it so you hardly notice it? Or do u want people to notice? Like isn't the point f key changes to get the audiences focused after aboring part or w/e? If its hardly noticable how does it catch the audiences attention again?


Well when you do a key change, its usually near the end of the song to recapture the listeners attention. In choir, its after we do the chorus for the second time that we will change keys (making it sound higher), then do the chorus one more time and end it with an outro. Now this is usually. But its not a matter a slowly changing. Just all of a sudden change keys and mix the listener up so that they will listen longer. Remember though, dont change keys in the middle of a solo. Not a good idea.
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#4
Quote by UNIe
You should change the key of a song by using chords that are in both keys.


Heh, well, then you wouldn't be changing keys? Eventually, you have to use different chords, and sometimes you may have NO chords that are in both .

My quickest answer is to find your way to work to the V7 chord of the NEW key you want to go to, get on the V7 chord, and it will resolve nicely to your new tonic. Just try and find a way to resolve to that new tonic chord. There is a whoooole lot on this subject in real books though, heh.


@fraser - I find you can really capture attention by modulating up a major second during a solo, it builds intensity.
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#5
Quote by nightwind
Heh, well, then you wouldn't be changing keys? Eventually, you have to use different chords, and sometimes you may have NO chords that are in both .


I think thats what he meant, just using chords that ar ein both keys for the transistion.

Ok, so what is thepurpose of key changes? Do you want it noticable or non noticable? or is it different in different cases?n If you try to make it non noticable, what is the point of the key change?

Can some people tell me some songs that key changes occur and about where in the song a key change occurs. thanks
Quote by Johnljones7443
Shredding is having control over your instrument and being free of technical obstacles so your music is not limited by your playing ability.

Quote by Aidy Damage
Classical Gas is when you fart and it smells like the inside of a violin. EVERYONE knows that. n00bs...
#6
help?
Quote by Johnljones7443
Shredding is having control over your instrument and being free of technical obstacles so your music is not limited by your playing ability.

Quote by Aidy Damage
Classical Gas is when you fart and it smells like the inside of a violin. EVERYONE knows that. n00bs...
#7
^ there are many ways to change keys, nightwind and justin have both pointed out 2 very tried and true methods, say the song is in E minor (i do love my E minor scale) you could modulate up to F# minor (Enter sandman does this repeatedly throughout the song)

one way is to modulate through like keys that share same notes but sharpen or flatten one or 2 notes differently, say you have C major C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C and want to go to E minor which is E,F#,G,A,B,C,D you would just have a different D chord (major instead of minor) and and you could go through C major and emphasize the D major chord....

- now the fun part, finding new ways to modulate.... this is my own little bits of theory, things i've noticed and use that I personally like the sound of... building around the next movement.... , say you're in E phrygian (i think, E,F,G,A,Bb,C,D) and you think hmmm i want to shift to oh lets say C# pentatonic. I would do something like play around the C# before shifting (such as, create chord progression that sounds like it should build into C#, something like F,Bb,A,C-> C#, E,F#,Ab <- these would all just be V chords)

another way is chromatic movements which can give a sense of urgency or off balance movement, just shifting up the root note 1/2 step for each quarter note and ending on the new key (again this is good for V chords)

yet ANOTHER way, which gives a sense of urgency is what i like to call the M/m modualtion. Say you start again on E minor and want to end up on Ab minor, you can shift chromatically up altering between major and minor chords like this....

Em,F,F#m,G,Abm