#1
I was watching a Satch lesson on Surfing With The Alien.

He says its a cross between G pentatonic, G mixolydian, and G dorian....the intrto that is, the riff.

So does that mean they are all G scales, based off the root G, or G Dorian as in the key of F etc??
#2
the note would be what u use for a G scale (F#) but if u was playing ing a dorian scale u wouldn't start on a G you would start on another note (not sure on what it is) but u would still use the scale notes.. so say id the dorian scale started with D instead of goin G A B C D E F# D you would go D E F# G A B C D if u get what i mean
Quote by musical donkey
cyclobs you are demented..... in a good way
#3
Yea I understand that, I'm just confused about the notation. I've used modes for ages but I've never really copped onto this:

Lets say you are playing the Dorian mode of G major.
Is it called G Dorian, or A Dorian?
#4
G dorian.. i think.. i haven't learnt that much up on mode's yet but i have a basic knowlage on it
Quote by musical donkey
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#5
no, i think is would be called the A dorian, as its root note is A
look here, it really explains alot: http://www.zentao.com/guitar/modes/
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#6
If ypu play Dorian with the root note as G, it is G Dorian.

If you play Dorian but use the notes in the G major scale, it is A Dorian.

As for the Satch song, he switches between a couple of parallel (same root) scales, though it is G Dorian for the most part.

Of course, there's the solo in C# Phrygian that screws everything up, but I just meant the parts in G.
#7
no all the root notes are in G.its a classical technique to use different scales with the same bass note but i forget the name of it
#9
Quote by Guitar Guy21
Pitch Axis Theory?
That's Satch's term, though I'm pretty sure that isn't the classical term.

It just involves switching between parallel modes.
#10
Quote by cyclobs
G dorian.. i think.. i haven't learnt that much up on mode's yet but i have a basic knowlage on it

Wrong wrong wrong for the love of God wrong. The root note is A, so it's A dorian.
#11
Quote by scrilly
Wrong wrong wrong for the love of God wrong. The root note is A, so it's A dorian.
The root note is G, so it's G scales, Dorian included.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The root note is G, so it's G scales, Dorian included.

The post above the question seemed to imply that the root note was A.

Bottom line, it's named for the root note.
#13
Quote by Megatallica
Yea I understand that, I'm just confused about the notation. I've used modes for ages but I've never really copped onto this:

Lets say you are playing the Dorian mode of G major.
Is it called G Dorian, or A Dorian?


A Dorian, and the key is A. If you wanted to play in G, you would use G Dorian.

The root note is G, so it's G scales, Dorian included.


Dorian, derived from G major, is A dorian. It's a minor scale in the key of A, and it's root note is A.
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Feb 3, 2007,
#14
Quote by scrilly
The post above the question seemed to imply that the root note was A.

Bottom line, it's named for the root note.
I don't see that, but the song is (mostly) in G, heavily using the Dorian mode.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I don't see that, but the song is (mostly) in G, heavily using the Dorian mode.

Quote by cyclobs
the note would be what u use for a G scale (F#) but if u was playing ing a dorian scale u wouldn't start on a G you would start on another note (not sure on what it is) but u would still use the scale notes

I could be reading it incorrectly of course, it is nigh-on incomprehensible.
#16
Quote by scrilly
I could be reading it incorrectly of course, it is nigh-on incomprehensible.
His post is just plain wrong. He didn't even post a D Dorian scale.

If you want to play G Dorian, you play the notes of F major but use G as your root note. If you want to switch between a G Dorian feel to a Mixolydian feel, you would switch to G Mixolydian.
#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
His post is just plain wrong. He didn't even post a D Dorian scale.

I didn't even bother reading the nots