#1
what's the difference between using A maj or F# minor, they have the same notes, but what's the difference, i'm extremely confused
#2
they are relative keys...they will have different emotional qualitiies (f#m will sound sadder, mnore minor) becasue of the placement of the root relative to the key and interval structure and stuff like that
#3
The difference is the root note and how they are used. A Major Pentatonic is an A major scale with A as the root. F# Minor Pentatonic is an F# minor scale with F# as the root.
#4
no its selective tones that work well with the chord but its basically a minor and major scale
#5
Quote by PinkFloyd73
no its selective tones that work well with the chord but its basically a minor and major scale
He means that the pentatonic is formed by removing some of the avoid tones, which is correct, but doesn't explain why A C D E G (A minor pent) is different than C D E G A (C major pent).
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
He means that the pentatonic is formed by removing some of the avoid tones, which is correct, but doesn't explain why A C D E G (A minor pent) is different than C D E G A (C major pent).


ya its different because of the interval structure and how intervals relate to each other and where the root goes. ask your teacher if you have one
#7
Quote by PinkFloyd73
ya its different because of the interval structure and how intervals relate to each other and where the root goes. ask your teacher if you have one


no, i don't have one,


can you explain me what the **** is an interval
#8
Quote by redwing_suck
Well, right. Chords come from scales. It's an abstract idea, this "modes=scales=chords" business. It's not really meant to be taken literal, but it seems to be a somewhat key underpinning in scale theory. You can treat all of them, chords scales and modes, the exact same.

But again, it's not really a literal thing.



Quote by deluxity
can you explain me what the **** is an interval
An interval is the distance between notes, not in length between fingertips when they are fretted, but in musical distance. For instance, C is three frets higher than A. Each fret is a semitone, so the two notes are three semitones apart. We call a three semitone distance a "minor third."

I'm sure there is a more detailed explanation in the MT sticky.