#1
So I started practicing using my third finger. I started off with basic right hand techniques ( 1 - 2 - 3 - 2 - 1 finger pattern), then I started doing chromatics and stuff. Anyway I talked to a friend of mine at school who is one of the top bass players there, and he told me that using your third finger is only for fast triplets...is this the only advantage of learning a third finger?
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Last edited by Felas_kevin at Feb 3, 2007,
#3
The first half of your post is talking about your fretting hand and your friend is talking about your plucking hand.

So can you rephrase your question?


If we are talking plucking hand. Then it is good for fast triplets but it's also good for just playing.
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#4
I am talking about the right hand, plucking hand. How is it good for anything but soloing?
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#5
If you can learn to use all four fingers without the galloping effect, then that's a very good thing
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#6
I understand its a "good thing"....but how is it useful in any practical way?
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#8
Quote by Greenday389
You can go faster.


I can play much much faster with 2 fingers than with 3. To avoid the 'galloping effect', I play 1-2-3-2-1-2-3, but Billy Sheehan plays 1-2-3-1-2-3. But, for some reason, I just get slowed down when breaking out 3 fingers.

However, if you do use 3 fingers for triplets (i.e. one gallop), it works really well. I recommend using 2, and then 3 for triplets.
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#9
Quote by thefitz
I can play much much faster with 2 fingers than with 3. To avoid the 'galloping effect', I play 1-2-3-2-1-2-3, but Billy Sheehan plays 1-2-3-1-2-3. But, for some reason, I just get slowed down when breaking out 3 fingers.

However, if you do use 3 fingers for triplets (i.e. one gallop), it works really well. I recommend using 2, and then 3 for triplets.

You just have to practice going 1-2-3-1-2-3.....

Going 1-2-3-2-1-2-3-2-1... basicly in the technique has to slow you down, hence why you are going faster with 2 fingers instead of 3.
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#10
Quote by Greenday389
You just have to practice going 1-2-3-1-2-3.....

Going 1-2-3-2-1-2-3-2-1... basicly in the technique has to slow you down, hence why you are going faster with 2 fingers instead of 3.


John Myung goes 1-2-3-2-1-2-3-2-1 and he can play plenty fast.
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#11
I sometimes use my third finger for triplets but i still need to practice using it more but i find it really useful when playing something like iron maiden (yes i know he only uses 2, i cant play that fast yet)
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#12
i just find that having that third finger allows for easier string skipping, faster 16th notes, and ripping Maiden basslines.
you'd actually be surprised how much dimension you can add to your playing with the 3rd finger.

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#13
i just find that having that third finger allows for easier string skipping,


I also find the third finger makes it easier with string skipping.

When I play with three fingers I go 3-2-1-3-2-1-3-2-1 and so on, it works for me.


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#15
Quote by Zeelod
I also find the third finger makes it easier with string skipping.

When I play with three fingers I go 3-2-1-3-2-1-3-2-1 and so on, it works for me.

i do the 3-2-1-3-2-1 patern as you. it works fine for the galop technique.
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#16
I can pluck with all fingers except the pinky Lately I've been using 3-2-3-2-3-2, no real practical purpose but it's fun to do different things, and I can do the metal horns thing with it I guess. It's not that cool. It's hard for me to gallop using the 3-2-1-3-2-1 pattern, I get insane speed using it! The fingers, just have this, fan like bend flow effect.. I only use use it, well after hours of playing my 2-1-2-1, 1-2-1-2 finger gets a little tired. I'd say that I have pretty good right hand skills.

This was an entirely too long post.


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Last edited by Zeelod at Feb 4, 2007,
#17
Quote by thefitz
I can play much much faster with 2 fingers than with 3. To avoid the 'galloping effect', I play 1-2-3-2-1-2-3, but Billy Sheehan plays 1-2-3-1-2-3. But, for some reason, I just get slowed down when breaking out 3 fingers.

However, if you do use 3 fingers for triplets (i.e. one gallop), it works really well. I recommend using 2, and then 3 for triplets.


You're slowing down might be due to technique. The way you're playing means that every other note is played using your 2nd finger, meaning it only has one note's time before it needs to be plucking the string again.

If you use the 1-2-3-1-2-3 technique, each finger gets a two-note rest before it has to play again, giving you more time to get it into position and ready to pluck the string. And because all your fingers get an even amount of 'rest time', none of them is under any more strain than the others, meaning you should be able to play faster and more smoothly.
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#18
I find it's faster to use Steve DiGiorgio's technique and go 3-2-1-2-3-2-1-2 for straight notes.

Using your third finger mainly helps you in playing faster, yes, but not only in triplets. You'll learn to play scales and other patterns faster as well, as you have an extra finger to play them, as opposed to trying to blaze with two fingers.