#1
i searched and didnt find the answer im looking for

okay...lets say i play a chord prog. like

C, Em, G (key of C you all know)

and i play C ionian okay...

but if i want to play aeolian, its a aeolian i get that...but i dont get why its like that...how am i shifting the scale and stuff...im so confused with these...im self taught...but im confused whats the formula itll be so much easier for me that way lol

but for easy's sake...keep it key and c and tell me how i would do this...i dont get it please clear this up for me please im desperate lol


edit: is aeolian WHWWHWW? what would the formula still be...
#2
"Shifting the scale" This is a problem with people not learning theory.

A Aeolian has the same notes as C Ionian, but it is in the key of A.
#3
its just similar i get that i know its not the "same" what i meant when i said shifting was altering or w/e...modes is just a different way to put the scale or something like that....but..

im still so confused....
bleh
#4
its just similar i get that i know its not the "same" what i meant when i said shifting was altering or w/e...modes is just a different way to put the scale or something like that....but..

im still so confused....
bleh


It's not similar, it's the same, as in it's exactly the same scale. The modes are just different ways of describing the same scale - the aeolian is the 6th mode of the major scale meaning in the case of C, you play the exact same notes as c major, but simply start the pattern from the 6th note of the scale, which is A in this case.
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#5
ok...so a aeolian is the same as c major, and a aeolian should be used in the key of a? i have a theory book i was just really confused so i asked here...if thats it i get it...i know its more conplicated isnt it, or is remembering all the details of each mode the hard part?
#6
You don't have to use A aeolian, in A - in terms of picking a scale you'd theoretically use the one that best fits the chord progression, however it's best not to think about it in those terms. Rather, just think of the modes as ways to describe whatever it is you may be playing.

As far as improvising goes, if you start of using the basic pentatonic minor and familiarise yourself with how it sounds you'll gradually learn other notes you can use that are outside the scale, either as passing notes or to add interest to your playing. With enough familiarity, you'll find yourself adapting the scale slightly to fit better with different chord progressions....and those adaptations will generally lead you into different modes naturally.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
C Em G is your progression.

If you stay in the key of C major while this progression is in the backing, you will be playing C major over the C chord, E Phrygian over the Em chord, and G Mixolydian over the G chord - technically.

A Aeolian is not the same as C Ionian. They have the same notes but they are different scales with different intervals, sounds, and usage. Even though they share the same notes, C Ionian is a C scale and A Aeolian is an A scale.
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Feb 4, 2007,