#1
id like to know what scales or chord progressions i could use in playing jazz.

thanks in advance
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#2
Start playing with melodic minor and it's harmonized chord scale. I'd recommend buying a book. Jazz is 99% theory, it's not something you can simply pick up like Rock or Blues.
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#3
All of them.

The jazzy sound you're probably thinking of, in its most basic form, are grace notes.
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#4
Well you should learn the 12 bar blues progression. Thats a I-IV-V progression that is used with dominant 7 chords. Also learn the blues scale.
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#5
Quote by anoceanapart
All of them.

The jazzy sound you're probably thinking of, in its most basic form, are grace notes.


Eh? No. It's the sound of following the chords much more closely than any rock or blues player would.

Start off with learning the major scale, the 7 modes of the major scale and what chords to use them over. And be sure to actually understand.
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#6
^Besides understand, (know how to) use them! Use them, use them, use them. Know what you're doing at all times.
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#8
Keep track of nasty key changes. In rock songs the key usually stays constant throughout most of the song, but in Jazz it can change all over the place, so you can't just play in one or two positions and let the chords bring out the modes, you have to think and choose everything.
#9
Quote by Resiliance
Eh? No. It's the sound of following the chords much more closely than any rock or blues player would.


Meh, I'd disagree. Perhaps thats the way SOME jazz is played but you could have a Rock song with chord changes all over the place, or a classical piece or a pop piece. (That isnt what defines Jazz). Secondly, there is so much jazz out there that isnt based on multiple chord changes, (think Modal Jazz).

Jazz has a certain feel to the way you play your notes. Lots of notes are swung often for example. In my opinion it is something that you CAN "just" pickup like Rock or Blues. I suggest you listen to it, it really doesn't have to be dominated by intense theory. I mean if your looking to play in the Bebop or even Hardbop style then yea, I guess you are gonna have to learn just that - how to follow chords.
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#10
Well I see what you mean but I would define swung eighths as far more important sound of the jazz idiom than the ol' acciaccatura
#11
Quote by Resiliance
Eh? No. It's the sound of following the chords much more closely than any rock or blues player would.

Start off with learning the major scale, the 7 modes of the major scale and what chords to use them over. And be sure to actually understand.


Yeah, but if the color tones weren't present you'd simply be arpeggiating the chords, yes?
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#12
Quote by anoceanapart
Yeah, but if the color tones weren't present you'd simply be arpeggiating the chords, yes?


Obviously, but grace notes are something totally different...

And al_, quite simply, you're wrong about that my friend. The following of the elaborate chords is definitely a signature jazz thing. FYI, in case you're talking about smooth jazz, I don't consider that jazz.
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#13
Quote by Resiliance
Obviously, but grace notes are something totally different...

And al_, quite simply, you're wrong about that my friend. The following of the elaborate chords is definitely a signature jazz thing. FYI, in case you're talking about smooth jazz, I don't consider that jazz.


It was an error in wording on my part. A grace note can, and usually does double as a color tone, though a color tone is not always a grace note. The whole square/rectangle situation.

And al_ isn't 100% wrong. Just take a look at a tune with few changes such as Miles' 'Milestones' or Coltrane's 'Footprints'. With a solo section that only consists of 2 chords the improvisationist is going to have to go outside of chord tones, or else its gonna be a hell of a boring solo.
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#14
Im not talking about smooth jazz. Incase you missed my bracket I mentioned Modal jazz, thats the first example that pops to my mind.

And I disagree with you. If it has to come down to it, I interpret jazz differently.
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#15
What do ju guys mean by........ following the chords more closely ??

I just listen to Holdsworth or Charlie Parker or Joe Pass....... and my head turns numb !!!
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#16
Quote by al_
Im not talking about smooth jazz. Incase you missed my bracket I mentioned Modal jazz, thats the first example that pops to my mind.

And I disagree with you. If it has to come down to it, I interpret jazz differently.


In the case of modal jazz, indeed, there aren't as many chords. But even then, the chords are still being followed more closely in the sense that pretty much everything, from superimposition of certain arpeggios to create extensions of the chords to reharmonisation to a walking bass line or chord melody movement is looked at with regard to the (extended) chord(s), which you wouldn't get as much in other genres.

I don't think we disagree, I think we're on the same side here, but you're just not interpreting me correctly.
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#17
So it's just like......

Play chromatic/other scale lines added with notes that are in the chord ??
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#18
Quote by bluespunkmetal
So it's just like......

Play chromatic/other scale lines added with notes that are in the chord ??


On a very, very, very basic level, yes, without getting into things like outside playing...
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He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

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#19
Quote by Resiliance
In the case of modal jazz, indeed, there aren't as many chords. But even then, the chords are still being followed more closely in the sense that pretty much everything, from superimposition of certain arpeggios to create extensions of the chords to reharmonisation to a walking bass line or chord melody movement is looked at with regard to the (extended) chord(s), which you wouldn't get as much in other genres.

I don't think we disagree, I think we're on the same side here, but you're just not interpreting me correctly.


Mhm, of course what youre saying is completely true. And I see what youre saying now, and of course I agree with you, Jazz 99.99% time is as you summed it up "the sound of following chords more closely.."

And therefore that is a characteristic of "the jazz sound" if I may word it as such.

Initially I wasnt thinking of that being "the jazz sound" simply because in my opinion -
Following chords closely does not always = Jazz. Nevermind that though, its folly to think youre on a different page than me.

Anyways, if I may follow up on that to the threadstarter, listen to Jazz albums, and pay attention to the style of phrasing that is used and the rhythms and grooves present as well as learning your theory of modes and chord formation and chord to mode relation.
If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is - Infinite.

http://thetravellingtrip.dmusic.com
^^ some sort of strange new slimey brew, its a psychedelic mess.
Check it out
#20
Explain "outside playing"... and don't tell me to listen to Allan Holdsworth......... I cry everytime i do
Tone is all ...... well probably 75%, in your fingers.
The rest depends on your wallet's thickness !!

Keep the faith, baby!!
#21
Quote by bluespunkmetal
Explain "outside playing"... and don't tell me to listen to Allan Holdsworth......... I cry everytime i do


The most basic explanation: making "wrong" notes sound ''right" in the context of what is being played.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#22
Chord progressions? Well, some popular ones are:

iim7 V7 | Imaj7

Imaj7 vim7 | iim7 V7 | iiim7 VI7 | iim7 V7
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