#1
Hi Guys

can sombody explain what are plophonic licks exactly I came across the term earlier on the net but did not explain the meaning???

S
#2
well since nobody has answered this yet..... courtesy or merriam-webster.com !!

Main Entry: po·lyph·o·ny
Pronunciation: p&-'li-f&-nE
Function: noun
Etymology: Greek polyphOnia variety of tones, from polyphOnos having many tones or voices, from poly- + phOnE voice -- more at BAN
: a style of musical composition employing two or more simultaneous but relatively independent melodic lines : COUNTERPOINT
#3
Thanks z4twenny.........but i still don't understand how its done................
#4
I've never heard of the term polyphonic licks, but I've heard of polyphony.

Judging from that definition it's just having two melodies play at once. So maybe someone plays a melody in G major and another would play in E aeolian just for a simple example, but the two melodies would be independent, with different rhythms and notes.
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#5
It's the beautiful part of baroque music that these "neo-classical" guitarist types miss out on

basically you have two or more independent melody lines that not only function as individual melodies each one in themselves but also create harmony vertically in often complex progressions
#6
Homophony ( homo meaning same ), would have two similar lines that move generally in the same direction ( up or down pitch-wise ). Polyphony ( poly meaning many ) would have many different lines ( still could be two ) and they would move in whichever direction they please, overlap each other in terms of pitch and rhythms can be different from each other.
#7
yes but they still would be coherent individually and as a whole

THAT's the hard part.
#8
Quote by Muphin
I've never heard of the term polyphonic licks, but I've heard of polyphony.

Judging from that definition it's just having two melodies play at once. So maybe someone plays a melody in G major and another would play in E aeolian just for a simple example, but the two melodies would be independent, with different rhythms and notes.


G Major and E Aeolian have the same notes.

#9
its where youll have 2 different melodies, often in different key signatures going at once
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#10
Quote by CowboyUp
G Major and E Aeolian have the same notes.



I know, trying to keep it simple.
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#11
Quote by EZLN libertad
its where youll have 2 different melodies, often in different key signatures going at once

Actually, the different melodies in a polyphonic piece are usually in the same key. They're just different individual melodies that can each stand on their own.
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#12
Quote by Nick_
It's the beautiful part of baroque music that these "neo-classical" guitarist types miss out on
Absolutely correct! Anybody who wants to understand polyphony absolutely must feed their ears with some J.S. Bach. If polyphony is a brand-new concept and you're not sure where to start in Herr Bach's catalog, I'd like to suggest his Two- and Three-Part Inventions. From there move on to the 48 fugues of his Well-Tempered Clavier. After you've gotten your head around those, move on to his Art of Fugue (my personal favorite recording being that released by the Julliard String Quartet). By this point, you and polyphony will have established a strong friendship, one you'll vow to maintain for the rest of your life.
basically you have two or more independent melody lines that not only function as individual melodies each one in themselves but also create harmony vertically in often complex progressions
Nick knows his stuff. Well said, Nick, and thanks.
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#13
Thanks

Now if you tried to get me to compose some, though, It'd probably be less than impressive....
#14
"Ten Speed (Of God's Blood And Burial)" by Coheed & Cambria uses a counterpoint in the main riff (which i think is polyphony?). Have a listen to it.

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