#1
How did you memorize the notes on the fretboard? I want to be able to look at a fret and know what note it is without working it all out, if that makes sense.
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#2
It takes a lot of practice, despite all these "learn all the notes in 60 minutes" books/programs, the only way to do it is to repeat it over and over.

Go through every note on each string (at least up to fret 12) and say all the notes out loud. Do this every time you pick up your guitar and you're on your way.

After a while you'll find yourself a little more able to distinguish notes, and you can start to really independently remember the notes by playing a random fret on the bottom E string, say G, and then find all the Gs on the other strings.

You can also try spelling out simple words, working through simple pentatonic scales while saying the notes out loud, anything that will get you naming notes repeatedly without relying on going through ABCDEFG in order.

Keep at it and in a few months you'll start finding it a lot easier.
#3
or you could take simple country songs and do the powerchord instead of the ummm, other kind. i made a mean folsom prison blues. It helps if you have a built in tuner on an acoustic.
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#6
or you could try fretboard logic... well thought of... i'm just starting to read it and it has already done me wonders.. it does not only help you memorize the notes but also their relations with each other so you can also understand chords and scales.... so after two months i would also be able to memorize not just the notes but the chords and scales...
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#7
I made this Excel file based on one that someone else made for a left-handed guitarist (sorry I can't give proper credit).

The unique thing about this way of looking at the fretboard is that it divides it up into the different octaves of the fretboard. All of the notes shaded a certain color are all in the same octave. You can easily see other places to play the same note (if you are looking for a place to play a D in the first octave, just looked in the shaded area for another D)

As far as learning the notes of the fretboard.. Those programs (ie. Fretboard Warrior) don't work well for me... I got to the point where I was awesome at picking the notes on the computer, but still struggled when I got a guitar in my hand.

The best way I have found is to just practice...

- I started with learning the notes on the 5th and 6th strings
- Then I learned the octaves of the notes on those strings
- Then I memorized certain landmarks on the fretboard (notes on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th frets for strings 4, 5, and 6)
- Then I memorized the Root, 3rd, and 5th for all of the positions of the major scales as additional landmarks
- Those are all of the easy things to do.. after that you can just practice scale, mode, and chord positions which will help further ingrain the positions into your head.
Attachments:
fretboard_notes.zip
#8
Quote by ErieJeepSteve
I made this Excel file based on one that someone else made for a left-handed guitarist (sorry I can't give proper credit).

The unique thing about this way of looking at the fretboard is that it divides it up into the different octaves of the fretboard. All of the notes shaded a certain color are all in the same octave. You can easily see other places to play the same note (if you are looking for a place to play a D in the first octave, just looked in the shaded area for another D)

As far as learning the notes of the fretboard.. Those programs (ie. Fretboard Warrior) don't work well for me... I got to the point where I was awesome at picking the notes on the computer, but still struggled when I got a guitar in my hand.

The best way I have found is to just practice...

- I started with learning the notes on the 5th and 6th strings
- Then I learned the octaves of the notes on those strings
- Then I memorized certain landmarks on the fretboard (notes on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th frets for strings 4, 5, and 6)
- Then I memorized the Root, 3rd, and 5th for all of the positions of the major scales as additional landmarks
- Those are all of the easy things to do.. after that you can just practice scale, mode, and chord positions which will help further ingrain the positions into your head.


thanks for the file im gunna try it out.
#9
Well, I've just learned what sounds good and what doesn't, so I always know if a note is gonna fit into the song before I play it. It comes with experience.
#10
Think of a note, and find everywhere you can play it. Think of another, repeat. Just do this continuously until you know one note and all of its locations by heart, then do it for another note, etc...

That's how I did it, and it worked quite well for me.
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#11
I used a program and ive been learning the notes on the fretborad in spare time or when im bored for the last 4 months or something and basicaly know were they all are off by heart. Search for it with google, its called 'Fretpro' and is free its also got lots of scales and chord shapes you can look at.
#13
First, remember this:
All natural notes are 1 step apart, except E and F, and B and C.

So:
let -'s represent frets

A-BC-D-EF-G

Now, I hope you know the names of the strings, so starthing with the low E:
Open would be E of course, then go one half step, which would be the first fret, and that'll be F, then go one whole step and get G.
Rinse and repeat till you get to the 12th fret which should be E again.

Apply this to all the strings, go over it and in no time you'll know the natural notes.
#14
Study the "Hopscotch Method" ......... it's in the lessons section of UG....
Tone is all ...... well probably 75%, in your fingers.
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#15
You don't need to memorize notes as they aren't random, they follow a constant pattern that repeats. All you need to do is know the intervals between them and you can find your way around no problem.
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#16
Quote by steven seagull
You don't need to memorize notes as they aren't random, they follow a constant pattern that repeats. All you need to do is know the intervals between them and you can find your way around no problem.


You definitely need to have them memorized if you want to be able to execute things that require note knowledge fast.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#17
The way I have memorized the fretboard is from scale patterns.

The Minor Diatonic really.

Saying the names of the notes as I climbed vertically up the neck, and using the extensions which (almost always) continue off the last note you played to the next mode.
#18
^Which is exactly the HOPSCOTCH METHOD !!
Tone is all ...... well probably 75%, in your fingers.
The rest depends on your wallet's thickness !!

Keep the faith, baby!!
#20
I use satch's method, and it works pretty well for me. Just set the metronome at a comfortable tempo, play the same note on the whole fretboard, following the beats. Start with any note, C maybe, and continue to Db etc. Raise the tempo etc when you get better.