#1
I'm troubled. The pros do it and its fine. But theyre pros. do any amatuer band out there play slow songs live? how well do they do down in front of a new audience?
#3
I don't quite understand your question.
Quote by shattamakar
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Hit this once or twice, and you'll be twice as nice.
#4
I guess the hardest part is keeping everything together; people might want to rush, but that's also want to rush for faster songs...what are you asking exactly?
Who dat?
#5
If you rehearse your songs well enough and everyone knows what they are meant to be doing, etc...you can play anything live...fast or slow.
#7
Slow.. fast... what's the difference... you either know the song or you don't... I don't get it.
#8
They go great if you keep the tempo down and concentrate on the groove. The inexperienced player will tend to rush a slow song and it looses its effect.
#10
from a technical standpoint, slow songs can be hard b/c every note usually counts for more, so screwups are therefore more noticable; plus, keeping a proper meter in a song with a lot of rests can throw you off.

but in terms of audience response: older audiences, especially in a restaurant/club type settings, are usually okay with it; teenagers in leather and makeup might not be so into it. But it really depends on your audience (I live in Berkeley CA, near locally-infamous punk club Gilman, and I wouldn't recommend slow songs to most first-time performers there), and the type of set you're playing. I'd put your slow numbers in the second half of your set, for sure. Otherwise, I say go for it, and if you're really concerned, go to a couple performances by other bands where you're playing, if you have time.
#11
Quote by *palm*`*muted*
from a technical standpoint, slow songs can be hard b/c every note usually counts for more, so screwups are therefore more noticable; plus, keeping a proper meter in a song with a lot of rests can throw you off.

but in terms of audience response: older audiences, especially in a restaurant/club type settings, are usually okay with it; teenagers in leather and makeup might not be so into it. But it really depends on your audience (I live in Berkeley CA, near locally-infamous punk club Gilman, and I wouldn't recommend slow songs to most first-time performers there), and the type of set you're playing. I'd put your slow numbers in the second half of your set, for sure. Otherwise, I say go for it, and if you're really concerned, go to a couple performances by other bands where you're playing, if you have time.



Thanks. This is the answer I was looking for.