#1
I''ve been playing guitar for about a year. When beside a guitarist from my school I'm right there up top with my playing, BUT I have no clue of theory, I can look at tabs and learn what I desire, but I wanna go further. I have always been interested in writing music and songs and now I'm ready to take that step. I have no knowledge of the music talk such as the circle of fifths, and so on. I tried the lesson here on UG but got confused, so could somone here help me step by step with theory and all I need to know? I have aim, sn is "a battled reaper" I really want to learn all I can about theory and everything to improve my playing and knowledge. thanks.
#3
that's what I've been looking at, the ver first section on intervals confuses me, wht does it mean by "augmented" and "unison" also where it says

You have 4 perfect intervals. Unison, Fourth, Fifth, and Octave. A perfect interval inverts to a perfect interval, and when you ad the interval numbers together, you will always get 9. So if you know a P4 inverts to another perfect interval, you know (9-4 = 5, P inverts to P) so a P4 inverts to a P5. Same thing with unison. Unison inverts to the octave. The other intervals (2, 3, 6, 7) are either minor or major, and a major interval inverts to a minor one, and vise versa. So with your formula, you can find that a minor third inverts to a major sixth (3 + 6 = 9)

what's all the adding and P4, etc. mean?
#4
what helped me is typing in google guitar music theory or something and a link came up that was somewhere along the line of like "the best theory for guitarists" or something like that and then I took 6 pages of notes in a notebook. Now I know alot of it just from writing it all down, the definitions of a whole bunch of crap and stuff, and just a general idea of what to do in different situations. plus i have a handy guide if i ever forget anything.
#5
Unison is the same exact note (in the same octave as well). Augmented is to increase by a half step. For example, G is the fifth of C, and G# is the augmented fifth.

P4 mean a Perfect fourth, same with P5, a perfect fifth. The adding can be summarized by understanding that if you invert a fifth, for example, you have a fourth. If you play a double stop that is a fifth... i.e. C and G, the interval is a fifth (essentially a power chord on guitar). If you invert it and make G the lower note and C the higher note, the interval becomes a perfect fourth.

Hope this helps?
#7
A powerchord is an example of a perfect fifth interval. In an A powerchord, A is the root and E is a fifth higher. But what about when you play that extra A octave note? Then you are playing an E to A interval. That is a fifth in the opposite direction, the inversion; it is a fourth. Obviously, 5+4=9, so from there, we can determine that inverted intervals add up to 9.

Unison is 1 and octave is 8. 8+1=9.

Now we get into minor intervals (this does not refer to chord tonality). The opposite of going from G to A, a major second, is going from A to G, a minor seventh. 2+7=9. The opposite of going from A to C, a minor third, is going from C to A, a major sixth. 3+6=9.

There is a pettern here. To figure out the inverted interval, subtract the numerical value of the interval (for a minor third, the numerical value is 3) from 9. For a minor third, you get 9-3=6, so some kind of sixth is the inverse. Since the original interval is minor, the inverse is major, so the inverse of a minor third is a minor sixth.

Get it?
#8
I'll be honest, I don't understand what you said.^^ I try to learn as much theory as possible, but I don't what you said. You evaluate more please?
#9
Listen, alot of these guys will make it sound like it's rocket science. It's not . 7 major notes.
7 major chords. What sounds good IS good. Learn runs and leads that you can fit to ANY song. Play by FEEL, what's in your soul, NOT what's in your brain. Trying to memorize all these different scales will drive you to drink.
#10
Quote by milkman1960
Listen, alot of these guys will make it sound like it's rocket science. It's not . 7 major notes.
7 major chords. What sounds good IS good. Learn runs and leads that you can fit to ANY song. Play by FEEL, what's in your soul, NOT what's in your brain. Trying to memorize all these different scales will drive you to drink.

Music theory is not a rule. It's a guideline and helps you learn what sounds like what and why it sounds like that. Music theory doesn't mean you cannot play with feel. If anything, it helps you play better since you know precisely what you are doing. And there are more than 7 major chords....

But, I will agree with you that music theory seems like "rocket science" when you start learning, but as you learn more, it gets easier...somewhat, just make sure to understand things fully and not jump head-first into everything.
#11
Quote by milkman1960
Listen, alot of these guys will make it sound like it's rocket science. It's not . 7 major notes.
7 major chords. What sounds good IS good. Learn runs and leads that you can fit to ANY song. Play by FEEL, what's in your soul, NOT what's in your brain. Trying to memorize all these different scales will drive you to drink.


That's ridiculous. All music theory does is explain why certain musical concepts sound the way they do. It allows you to focus on making the song sound the way you want instead of guessing. There is absolutely no reason not to learn theory.

And what do you mean by "7 major notes"? Are you referring to the notes of the major scale? You realize they change depending on the key, right?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by milkman1960
Listen, alot of these guys will make it sound like it's rocket science. It's not . 7 major notes.
7 major chords. What sounds good IS good. Learn runs and leads that you can fit to ANY song. Play by FEEL, what's in your soul, NOT what's in your brain. Trying to memorize all these different scales will drive you to drink.



Don't listen to this, it's utter nonsense. This argument has been countered so many times I want to cry.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#13
I strongly suggest learning the major scale, minor pentatonic first until you can play them from heart on thy axe.
Once you have done that learn the notes on the guitar neck up to the 12th fret.
Now once you know this take your major scale and memorise its scale degrees. These are numbers given to each note in the scale and goes up to seven the back to 1 also known as the root. The root depicts the scales key and if you have learnt your notes on the guitar you should always know what key your playing in which is important.

heres some realy good websites for theory and how it applies to thy axe and a program which is realy good for learning scales and notes on the neck.


Theory website
Another theroy website
And yet another. v good
FretPro

Hope this all helps.
#14
Quote by GuitarGuyXII
I'll be honest, I don't understand what you said.^^ I try to learn as much theory as possible, but I don't what you said. You evaluate more please?
What didn't you understand?

Please don't answer with "the entire post," because that doesn't help me at all.