#1
Ok i Play bass, but recently i've been hooked to the acoustic guitar and i want to get myself one. When i browse sites and check out reviews, i get phrases like "plug it in" and " sounds awesome with amp" ... the acoustic that interests me most is the alvarez RD20s....but the main point is is there anyway i can tell from websites (for now) whether i can plug the acoustic into an amp?


Thanks in advance!!!
#2
Ways to tell if an acoustic guitar is an electric acoustic guitar:

1. It says so.
2. It has controls on the top (check pictures).
3. It has an input, i.e. a place to plug in the cable.
#3
well it should say something about being an Electric-Acoustic guitar, or that it has a pickup of some sort.....look for those two signals.
"I count the days to find, what was left behind. All of these names I clutch, will lead me to my home. Mothers and fathers start, to drown the living proof.....I cant remember these Lakes of Blood." - Cedric Bixler-Zavala
#4
look for the part where it says "Acoustic/Electric"...haha, but yea, if it has controls, and input, or if it talks about plugging it in, then its probably acoustic/electric
#5
ok thanks very much...would you recommend electric-acoustics?
#6
They are more versatile, which means you can plug it in and amplify it to a larger audience... So basically if you intend to do this, then get one.
#7
can you install a pickup into a fully acoustic guitar later or something? I do have a group of friends and I do play bass for church...there's many things for me to consider? Also are the electro-acoustics and acoustics of the same price range very good in quality (and everything)? My budget is about 300 -400 Australian dollars, this can be compared to 200-250 US from musiciansfriend.
#8
But if you don't plan on amplifying it then your better off getting something without a pickup (thats the thingy that picks up the sound from the guitar and sends it over to the amp) in most cases as the money you are paying for the pickup is probably better spent on getting a guitar with better woods.
But that mainly applies to low end guitars.
And also if you can give us a price range then we can help you find a good guitar.
Seeing as your in Australia I'll give you a couple of links for Australian shops so you can get an idea of prices and whats available.

http://www.billyhydemusic.com.au
Billy Hydes has quite a few stores in NSW and throughout Australia. Chances are you have heard of them before and seen one of their shops.

http://www.allans.com.au/
The other big chain of music shops. You have probably heard of them as well.
Their online shop is here:
http://www.allansmusic.com.au/
The first link will only give you shop info and that sort of stuff.

And also a shop in Queensland that i often use to check out prices on gear at is
http://www.guitar.com.au/
It lists some gear that the previous shops don't have on their websites. Although both Allen's and Billy Hyde's have stuff that's not listed on their websites.

But if you can give us a budget, we can recommend good guitars for you to look at
#9
#10
The Epiphone DR200CE does not have a solid spruce top so thats a no go.
There was another Epiphone in there that was a Jumbo. I would suggest starting off with a Dreadnaught (these are the shapes and sizes of guitars, dreadnaught is your standard sort of guitar) as they are a good, easy size and good for starting off.

The Epiphone DR200S could be good but I have never played it before so I can't give you a solid opinion on it.

Both the Alvarez RD20S and the Yamaha FG700S are great guitars.
I personally really like the Yamaha, but the Alvarez is great too. And the Alvarez comes with a hard case which is really good for transporting it and storing it.

So out of all your choices I think the RD20S and the FG700S are the best choices, but defiantly play all the guitars in your price range to find one that you like.
Also, depending on how much you know about guitars, you may want to take someone shopping with you who has played for a while and knows what's good.
That way, you are more likely to end up with something good as you, if you have not had any experience with a guitar may get unlucky and may not make the best decision in terms of comfort of the guitar, playability and sound. You may not notice any of that at first, but give it a week and you will notice if the guitar feels uncomfortable to hold, and how easy/hard it is to play. Give it another couple of weeks and you will be able to tell by yourself if the guitar sounds good.
#12
Quote by h0d0g
ok thanks very much...would you recommend electric-acoustics?


No. I would recommend you don't pay any attention to whether it's electric acoustic or not. Most low end and mid level electric acoustics are overprices with low quality electronics. The biggest problem with electric acoustics is that the stock pickup is often times installed wrong which kills the tone from 1 or more strings.

Getting a normal acoustic and then buying an aftermarket pickup will typically get you a better guitar and a better pickup for less money.

If you do find a guitar that you love when it's unplugged and it just happens to have a pickup then the pickup is just a bonus. Don't let a pickup be a selling point.
Not taking any online orders.
#13
Well turned out I just got hooked to the Alvarez here are some pics...





I love it , thx every1 for their comments once again
Last edited by h0d0g at Feb 10, 2007,
#14
I just got an Alvarez ad60s a few months ago and I love it.
If you are just learning to play guitar, I would not go with an acoustic electric. You can get a way better deal on a straight-up acoustic, and if you want to play for a crowd in a couple of months you can invest in a soundhole pickup to plug yourself in.