#1
yes, its another thread about problems with scales, but anyway...

ive been learning scales and the like, i know a few now. i used to write song with no theory knowledge at all but now im trying to learn theory to put into my writing. now the problem is that whenever i try to use a scale to make a solo or lick, i have no idea how to use it to make a solo or lick

can anyone give me advice or tips on how to actually use scales and modes to write solos, licks and the like

thanks
#2
just download a few generic backing tracks and when you have learned your scale inside out just mess about playing it over the top of the backing track in key, and you'll eventually get to know what sounds cool and what doesnt and you'll be soloing decent in with a bit of work.
#3
Approach it from the other way - you don't really use modes and scales to dictate what you write, rather you use them do describe what you've written.
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#4
Take a page from John Petrucci's book. Use "fragments" of scales. Basically, that means just taking certain notes out of a scale and putting them into cool-sounding lick you like. Put them over a backing track. Now extrapolate on them if you want, and boom, a solo.

I recommend John Petrucci's "Rock Discipline" DVD, as it goes into great detail on this subject, as well as lots of others.

Hope this helps, and good luck!
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#5
Listen to the man ^^

I have issues with that DVD haha, I can't do it all, drives me nuts.

Although sir, you and I have a lot in common, I can only write music now using theory.
I assume you know probably a pentatonic, harmonic minor, or diatonic scale. When these scales are played vertically, play them horizontally if you want. Use your knowledge of whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half to climb up.

So if you're in the Key of D, start on the D note on the B string, do a D, E, F#, slide down to D, throw in maybe a harmonic chord, then climb E, F#, G, do another harmonic chord and so forth.
Being good at lead doesn't mean you need to play 160 notes per minute, since all you are "technically" playing is seven notes, stay close in your range, use string bends, pinch harmonics it, natural, sweep picking, even arpeggio chords if you want. It's not a necessity to do crazy Vai or Petrucci leads.
#7
Quote by steven seagull
Approach it from the other way - you don't really use modes and scales to dictate what you write, rather you use them do describe what you've written.


Thats the most sensible thing ive heard all year....
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