#1
What chords would sound good (preferably a 4 chord progression) underneath a solo using the B Phrygian mode? Thanks.
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#2
The order of chords under Phrygian is: B Minor - C Major - D Major - E Minor - F# Diminished - G Major - A Minor
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#3
How long of a solo would this even be? I mean, a Phrygian solo in only one mode can't be all that long, or exciting, assuming you're playing metal, since most rock musicians have not a clue what a Mixolydian mode even is.
#4
Just use them chords above and to make it more fun and different add some different chords not noted above then ask back here once youve got your chord progression and someone (not me im jst learning this stuff atm) will tell you what scales in what keys will go along with your chords. I cant imagine theres anything wrong with making your solo basic and sticking to one key and mode but its all up to you. Have fun.
#5
Quote by GuitarGuyXII
How long of a solo would this even be? I mean, a Phrygian solo in only one mode can't be all that long, or exciting, assuming you're playing metal, since most rock musicians have not a clue what a Mixolydian mode even is.

i play zero metal, and mostly rock, jazz, blues and reggae, and i can say that i know all the modes, so dont make assumptions about us rock players
anyways, what style is the solo in?
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#6
The solo is just a short little filler type of solo.
The song goes like this:
Verse > Chorus > Solo > Verse > Chorus > Breakdown

pretty simple, but it works for us. So it'd be about 30 seconds tops, and that's pushing it. I want it to have a sort of darker feel, since the song's Verse's are dark and fast, and the chorus' are meloncholy and slow, so it needs to have that overwhelming dark feeling, yet transition back to speed again.
Washburn HM Idol w/ SD JB in bridge > Ibanez Weeping Demon > Korg Pitchblack > Digitech Bad Monkey > Boss NS-2 > Boss DD-6 > Egnater Renegade > Splawn 2x12 w/ Weber Sig12Bs

Last edited by Unskathed at Feb 7, 2007,
#7
Quote by GuitarGuyXII
I mean, a Phrygian solo in only one mode can't be all that long, or exciting, assuming you're playing metal, since most rock musicians have not a clue what a Mixolydian mode even is.

That's not even remotely true. Heaps of rock songs are written in the Mixolydian mode - everyone from The Beatles to Pearl Jam have used it. Heavy metal guitarists are not the only users of modal theory in rock by a country mile. Hell, even the minor modes have been used all the time in popular rock music - White Rabbit is written in a Phrygian mode.

Threadstarter - generally speaking, the unique properties of the Phyrgian mode come out best over the corresponding minor triad or m7 chord.
Last edited by scrilly at Feb 8, 2007,
#8
^Not really - the third is rarely used in the phrygian chord seeing as the third of the iii chord is the fifth of the parent scale. Phrygian is both melodically and harmonically unstable and the third (atleast to my ear) strengthens the role of C too much and gives a major tonality (You could argue that C major over E-7 = E Phrygian, which is fine in theory - but doesn't hold up when I actually listen to it) which is why the third is dropped from the chord and the b9 added (The b9 is the characteristic - Phrygian is the only mode with a b9 and a perfect fifth) so the chord becomes _susb9, which is the most common chord to play Phrygian over.
#9
Quote by Johnljones7443
^Not really - the third is rarely used in the phrygian chord seeing as the third of the iii chord is the fifth of the parent scale. Phrygian is both melodically and harmonically unstable and the third (atleast to my ear) strengthens the role of C too much and gives a major tonality (You could argue that C major over E-7 = E Phrygian, which is fine in theory - but doesn't hold up when I actually listen to it) which is why the third is dropped from the chord and the b9 added (The b9 is the characteristic - Phrygian is the only mode with a b9 and a perfect fifth) so the chord becomes _susb9, which is the most common chord to play Phrygian over.

So basically just play an open B breakdown underneath it (we use 7 strings tuned to B)?
Okay, easy enough.
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#10
Archeo Avis Hello Avis,

Can you please explain me, how can you find the chords, which fall under B Phrygian mode?


The order of chords under Phrygian is: B Minor - C Major - D Major - E Minor - F# Diminished - G Major - A Minor
#11
Quote by Unskathed
The solo is just a short little filler type of solo.
If that's all, then you only need one chord, and the appropriate scale. A Bm chord or just a B bass, and the G major scale (any pattern) will give you B phrygian mode.

If you want a second chord, then a quick passing C would do.

The trouble with using too many chords is the section could just sound like a G major key sequence - or D mixolydian, E aeolian or A dorian, all stronger sounds than B phrygian. The more you're away from that Bm chord, the less phrygian it will sound. It would make no difference how much you emphasised B in your solo. The chords rule the modal sound, so make sure that B root is prominent in the bass.
Last edited by jonriley64 at Jul 13, 2017,
#12
Quote by avsmartshek40
Archeo Avis Hello Avis,

Can you please explain me, how can you find the chords, which fall under B Phrygian mode?


The order of chords under Phrygian is: B Minor - C Major - D Major - E Minor - F# Diminished - G Major - A Minor

The last time the person you are replying to posted on the forums was 7 years ago, so I don't think he will reply...

This is an old thread and you are not supposed to bump them. But when it comes to your question, you do it by harmonizing the scale.

Here is my reply to another thread with a similar question. It was a question about the chords in the key of F minor, but you can figure out the chords you can build from any scale the same way:

Quote by MaggaraMarine
Figuring out what the different chords of a key are is something you can do on your own. You do it by harmonizing the scale. To do this, you need to know how major, minor, diminished and augmented chords are built.

Now let's harmonize the scale by starting it from the root, the third and the fifth.

    R  3  5
I F Ab C
II G Bb Db
III Ab C Eb
IV Bb Db F
V C Eb G
VI Db F Ab
VII Eb G Bb


Then you look at the intervals between the chord tones and figure out their qualities.

The I chord is F Ab C. F-Ab is a minor third, F-C is a perfect fifth so it's a minor chord.
The II chord is G Bb Db. G-Bb is a minor third, G-Db is a diminished fifth so it's a diminished chord.
The III chord is Ab C Eb. Ab-C is a major third, Ab-Eb is a perfect fifth so it's a major chord.
The IV chord is Bb Db F. Bb-Db is a minor third, Bb-F is a perfect fifth so it's a minor chord.
The V chord is C Eb G. C-Eb is a minor third, C-G is a perfect fifth so it's a minor chord.
The VI chord is Db F Ab. Db-F is a major third, Db-Ab is a perfect fifth so it's a major chord.
The VII chord is Eb G Bb. Eb-G is a major third, Eb-Bb is a perfect fifth so it's a major chord.

You can do the same thing with any scale.

So instead of F minor, just use the notes of B Phrygian.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#14
Quote by avsmartshek40
MaggaraMarine

Thanx for the revert, mate. But I still do not get your point of deriving chords from the B Phrygian mode.
Also, why to use F minor scale ?!

As I said, the post is from another thread where the question was about the chords in the key of F minor. You use the same method to figure out the chords in any scale. Start it from the root, third and fifth and look at the intervals between the chord tones. I used the post to demonstrate how you would figure out the chords in any scale. F minor has nothing to do with it, but the same method works for any scale. You just replace the notes of F minor with the notes of B Phrygian (or whatever the scale is that you want to harmonize).

Do you understand chord construction? Do you know intervals? If not, that's something that you should learn about first. And honestly, if you don't understand chord construction or intervals, you shouldn't really be worried about the chords of B Phrygian. Learn about major and minor keys first.

    R  3  5
I   B  D  F#
II  C  E  G
III D  F# A
IV  E  G  B
V   F# A  C
VI  G  B  D
VII A  C  E


The I chord is B D F#. B-D is a minor third, B-F# is a perfect fifth so it's a minor chord.
The II chord is C E G. C-E is a major third, C-G is a perfect fifth so it's a major chord.
The III chord is D F# A. D-F# is a major third, D-A is a perfect fifth so it's a major chord.
The IV chord is E G B. E-G is a minor third, G-B is a perfect fifth so it's a minor chord.
The V chord is F# A C. F#-A is a minor third, F#-C is a diminished fifth so it's a diminished chord.
The VI chord is G B D. G-B is a major third, G-D is a perfect fifth so it's a major chord.
The VII chord is A C E. A-C is a minor third, A-E is a perfect fifth so it's a minor chord.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 13, 2017,