#1
I have A question. im making my own solo's up and stuff. but when doing modes, can it be like this(i know that when making your own stuff up there are no rules) Btw this is the ionian mode correct me if im wrong. i may have screwed up
Edit*** so let me rephrase and add another question. you use modes to slide your way into a solo right????? say im starting a mode and ending it with 7 then going to
a pentonic scale that starts wiht the last note of the mode( which is 7) is that how u use a mode with a scale????/


and how would you take the mode and peice it with say the *pentonic scale*??? im sorta new at solo's i just mainly make main riffs and stuff, And no im not a noob.
Last edited by SillyRabbit at Feb 7, 2007,
#2
Tab out the scale. I have no clue what you wrote.

Edit: I think I can answer this without knowing what you tried to write.

If you have a C Ionian scale and want to mix it with some pentatonic, use the C major pentatonic.

For soloing, just screw around and "borrow" some of your favorite licks. You should also watch the melodic control video.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Feb 7, 2007,
#3
If you're talking about only using the Ionian mode there, it's just the major scale, starting on the root note of whatever key you're in. And to adapt it to pentatonic...if I understand you correctly that is, just don't play the 2nd and the 6th, which leaves you with the major pentatonic scale.
#4
oh ok well im not tabbing it because my mode sounded sweet. and i like to be discreet... WOW I made a sweet rhyme. anyways. so yeah you just use modes to slide into a scale rite?????
#5
Quote by SillyRabbit
oh ok well im not tabbing it because my mode sounded sweet. and i like to be discreet
We all know what the Ionian mode sounds like. I don't think you need to be so protective of something that thousands of people know.

Quote by SillyRabbit
you just use modes to slide into a scale rite?????
No.


Read the stuff about modes in the MT sticky.
#6
You can do, but you can use them to create strange/exotic sounding ideas, like if you used the G Mixolydian whilst in the key G major, it would sound different to using the G major scale and would give a more chromatic feel and usually an exotic sound.
Well...I think i explained that how I mean lol...if i'm totally wrong by this definition, someone please correct me
Last edited by last_biscuit at Feb 7, 2007,
#9
Double post...NAY!

Quote by SillyRabbit
that dude is FUNNY the media control dude ahhhahahhahahhhh
His name is Marty Friedman and he is really good.

Quote by last_biscuit
You can do, but you can use them to creat strange sounding ideas, like if you used the G Mixolydian whilst in the key G major, it would sound different to using the G major scale and would give a more chromatic feel and usually an exotic sound.
Sort of. You have the right idea.

You wouldn't use G Mixolydian iver a purely G Ionian (natural major) progression since the F would clash with the F#. However, if there is no F# in any of the chords, or you're just playing over a G chord, Mixolydian will give a unique sound. Exotic is often used to describe modes, but I think that's a bit extreme to describe common Western scales. It will not be the normal sound, however.
#10
Quote by SillyRabbit
yeah but my variation is sweet... with the notes iv used


If it's a variation of the mode, with different notes, then it isn't actually that mode.
Last edited by last_biscuit at Feb 7, 2007,
#13
Quote by SillyRabbit
you can start a mode with any note on the fret board i thot


Yes but the actual mode you use changes depending on which scale the root note comes from orignally, i.e playing any old mode over a C major progression wouldn't be likely to sound very good, so you can't just play notes and call them one mode without giving the key of the chord progression, or saying the scale and it's original key etc
#14
alright well, the scale's just a pentonic major starting at 10-12 amd so on but the riff that goes with it and the chords used im keepin discreet Im just wondering how i Put the 2 together like do i take the mode and the scale and do what im not sure
#15
Quote by SillyRabbit
alright well, the scale's just a pentonic major starting at 10-12 amd so on but the riff that goes with it and the chords used im keepin discreet Im just wondering how i Put the 2 together like do i take the mode and the scale and do what im not sure
A mode is a scale. I don't know what you're asking.
#16
well dude im just starting doing solo's lol. i know my guitar but nothing about soloing iv looked at the lessons and none of em really stuck to meEDIT*** remember this im also a feel kinda guitarist.
#17
Well you can use the Ionian starting at 10th fret, but what exactly is it you don't understand? 'Cos i assume i haven't answered what you want there...you just play them whenever you want assuming the riff is in D major.
Edit: If the riff is in D major, you would use D Ionian, and if you want to use other modes etc well E Dorian is the same thing but starting on the E (2nd note of D major) and going to the octave E...you wouldn't hear the differenve unless you resolved to different notes whilst in this mode.
(i think that's what you meant....)
??
Last edited by last_biscuit at Feb 7, 2007,
#18
well.... as i see it a mode is half steps and whole steps... and a scale is well u know a scale but also half steps and stuff. I just dont understand why people say MODES are essential in a solo, when basically, everything is based on a scale. everything your playing is a scale in some sort. so how are modes and scales combined? why do people say to learn modes and scales if their both the same... I could be wrong about this, and maybe i should have more knowledge on theory since im just a feel guitarist and thats the way its always been but ya kno im just a tad confused
#19
anyways ima brb i gotta go eat some food. lol just read what iv posted and stuff and help me try to understand the both or somehting cuz im really confused
#20
Well...modes are just types of scales. A mode is essentially the major scale, but played starting on a different note of that scale.

For example, C Major is C Ionian, D Dorian, E Phrygian, F Lydian, G Mixolydian, A Aeolian, B Locrian. Simply put, this means that if you are in G major, the Ionian would be G, Dorian would be A, etc so you can count along from the first/key note and end up with the same scale but just starting from a different root note.

Modes are counted as separate because they are essentially just one scale, but they work by starting from the different notes, and then if you work it out you can select a certain mode to fit over different chords in a progression, or if you're lucky entire progressions depending on the sound you're after.

And you don't need to know about modes to write solos by the way, that's a load of rubbish. You can write entire songs without any knowledge of theory whatsoever, it's all down to your creative ability and how well you determine what sounds good and what sounds bad.
#21
I can tell that you know your stuff, but i also can tell that you're a feel player like me lol... anyways. If i wanna solo properly I should know modes and scales right??? and progressions and stuff but i already know some details about that
#22
Well, they help if you want to structure a solo after writing out chords or a riff in a certain key. The best way to learn modes i think is just to learn the major scale in all the places you can and then practise spotting it starting from different notes. As for the other scales it's just a case of learning each pattern i'm afraid.
P.S yeah lol most of what i write i just play what i like the sound of. I'd hate to tab out my songs as it would involve thinking lol
#23
^ the 7 basic church modes i learned initially just by learning the minor scale then adjusting the root note to a different interval (years and years ago). then when i started learning more about intervals i'd take and change 1 or 2 intervals on the scale and get a new mode (ie harmonic minor) i'd recommend that after learning your scales, then learning intervals and how notes react to each other so that you can REALLY make up your own scales, or play chromatically without limitations.
#24
Quote by last_biscuit
Well...modes are just types of scales. A mode is essentially the major scale, but played starting on a different note of that scale.

For example, C Major is C Ionian, D Dorian, E Phrygian, F Lydian, G Mixolydian, A Aeolian, B Locrian. Simply put, this means that if you are in G major, the Ionian would be G, Dorian would be A, etc so you can count along from the first/key note and end up with the same scale but just starting from a different root note.

Modes are counted as separate because they are essentially just one scale, but they work by starting from the different notes, and then if you work it out you can select a certain mode to fit over different chords in a progression, or if you're lucky entire progressions depending on the sound you're after.
I'm not liking this definition. While E Phrygian contains the same notes as C Ionian, they are quite different. C Ionian is a C scale, used in C major situations, in the key of C major. E Phrygian is an E minor scale that happens to have a flattened second. It is used in E minor situations and it is in the key of E minor (not if you look on a staff, but in application). Likewise, D Dorian is a D minor scale that happens to have a natural sixth. It is used in D minor situations and is in the key of D minor (again, not if you look on a staff, but in application).

Another important concept is how chords determone modes. What makes C D E F G A B C different than C D E F G A B C Nothing, it's the same notes. However, if the first is played over a C major chord, it is C Ionian. If it is played over A minor, it is A Aeolian.

Quote by last_biscuit
And you don't need to know about modes to write solos by the way, that's a load of rubbish. You can write entire songs without any knowledge of theory whatsoever, it's all down to your creative ability and how well you determine what sounds good and what sounds bad.
This is a bunch of BS. Learn the established "rules" and then break them.