#1
Hey everyone, my name's Kyle. A while back I had a lot of motivation to play, and I really wanted to learn. For my 13th birthday I got a BC Rich Warlock Bronze Series from ebay for about $200.00. It came with a 25 watt amp... I played around with the guitar and learned the basics and some terminology. I learned a few very simple intros... White Stripes, Eye of The Tiger, and I learned the Star Spangled Banner, which I never actually played all the way through...

To make a long story short, I slowly stopped playing for about a year or so... I think the big reason was because I was wanting to play so many different songs, I just didn't know how to do it. I downloaded powertab and saw ten million different symbols and characters on the screen and I had NO idea what to do. It was all very confusing and there was a lot coming at me. I was watching Satriani videos on YouTube, and it was pretty discouraging.

When it comes to the more advanced terminology, I'm guitar-illiterate. For example, I have no idea what a pinch harmonic is, or a metronome. I don't know my cholds, but I can read tabs and follow them fairly well. Some of the symbols I'm still learning, however.

I guess what I'm trying to ask is, where should I start again? I'm really into that classic rock sound, especially sounds like Satriani and Vai. I have a BC Rich Warlock, and I also bought a ZOOM 707II effects pedal. Is there any way I can make my guitar sound like Satch's? What do I need to do and what should I be working on? I feel like I'm in second gear. I have the motivation, just not the knowledge.
#2
Effects arn't gonna help you sound lie Satch, it's that simple. Even if you had the exact same rig as him, without technique, you've essentially got nothing!

To achieve such things, I guess it's best to look up and learn a bit of technical guitar playing...ie how to do pinch harmonics, legato runs, tremelo bar tricks, etc. Although I gotta say, of all people to aspire to, you've probably chosen one of the most difficult.
#3
Okay, well, I plug in and I play a few notes. It sounds absolutely nothing like the notes he would play if we were to play the same notes. What do I need to change to attain a SIMILAR sound? It doesn't have to be spot-on perfect, I just want to have a similar or close-to sound, so that when I play, it's relatively alike joe's sound.
#4
Quote by Muggus
Effects arn't gonna help you sound lie Satch, it's that simple. Even if you had the exact same rig as him, without technique, you've essentially got nothing!

To achieve such things, I guess it's best to look up and learn a bit of technical guitar playing...ie how to do pinch harmonics, legato runs, tremelo bar tricks, etc. Although I gotta say, of all people to aspire to, you've probably chosen one of the most difficult.
He meant the tone. If you had the exact same rig as him, you'd have his tone.
The Laney Thread are big and clever. No exceptions.
#5
See, that's what I'm talking about. I am guitar-illiterate. Excuse me for asking the improper question. Alrighty, so, having a Warlock means I can't really have the tone of the 80's or that classic Satch tone?
#6
Quote by JavaCrammer
See, that's what I'm talking about. I am guitar-illiterate. Excuse me for asking the improper question. Alrighty, so, having a Warlock means I can't really have the tone of the 80's or that classic Satch tone?


First off you need to get finger strength and quickness.
#7
How exactly do I do this, and how much finger strength do I need, now much quickness do I need, what's considered good... Is quickness and speed two different terms? What should I be practicing in order to attain finger strength and quickness? Common guys, sorry but it's a little vague. I'm looking for some hardcore information here.
#8
well, first you must understand that learning guitar is VERY dissapointing. You could practice all you want but ur not gonna learn in a day. Keep practicing. There are many different directions you could follow depending on ur tastes. One important thing is COORDINATION doesnt matter how fast ur fret hand is if ur picking hand aint NSYNC so PRACTICE PRACTICE Ur prolly gonna SUCK like everyone else did but keep at it
#9
I don't know what to practice on or what to learn... I have no idea where to even start. I'm looking at dozens of songs I'd like to play but when I look at the tabs it's madness.
#10
first learn the basics man....learn what note each string is when you play it open...and learn what note each fret is....learn what notes and intervals are...... learn some basic cords and how to read tabliture..... after u have learned that stuff move on and learn what a major scale is.... after u have mastered that learn the different modes of a major scale and once u get to this point you will have a better idea of what you need to teach yourself next
#11
well if u got some buddies go jam and have fun playin with SIMPLE power chords, or play by urself. Play ur favorite songs but dont focus on all the solos and riffs cuz u cant do 'em yet. Just play the power chords

STEP 1- LEARN POWER CHORDS
#12
What the heck is a chord and why are they useful, where and when will I ever use them? Same questions for "scales." What are they, why do I need to know them... What's the difference between a power chord and other chords, if there are other chords...

A few Q's...
1. What determines tone
2. How can I change my tone to something I want?

I know tabliture, and I can play from tabs. I just don't have the sound I want and I don't know how to do most of the techniques... My guitar doesn't have a hole for a whammy bar, and I hear they're useful... What exactly will a whammy bar allow me to do? ... Do I NEED one? Can I create the same effects without one?
#14
A chord is a collection of notes played at the same time. They are used in all sorts of music with all sorts of instruments. Worth learning.

A scale is a collection of notes following the scale pattern. For example, a C Major scale contains all the 'whole' (neither flat nor sharp notes). Therefore a C Major scale contains the notes C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C played as an ascent/descent. Scale notes can be chopped up to make up chords. Scales are required for making coherent solos within songs (I'm not really an expert theorist though, you may want a more detailed explanation from more of an expert).

Tone is the sound that comes out of your amp. You can shape the tone with the EQ, Gain controls, volume controls and the knobs on your guitar. Tone is affected by technique, guitar woods, components, electronics, pickups, cables, pedals and your amp.

A whammy bar raises/lowers pitch of your guitar when you pull/push on it. You don't necessarily need one, but one would be useful for what you want to play.

This is an open E Major chord:

E| 0
B| 0
G| 1
D| 2
A| 2
E| 0

You play all the notes at the same time. I'd strongly advise you to get a tutor to help you learn, or use resources on the internet to help you.

And remember, guitar is not easy. Skill comes with long hours spent practicing. You need dedication too. Just one thing to remember: Never feel daunted by it. There's always gonna be better people than you at anything, but c'est la vie.

Hope I helped a little :]
The Laney Thread are big and clever. No exceptions.
#15
chords = where all starts basically...
without chords solos will be out of key or tune...
basically chords are the basis for solos and other similar things...
the person who plays rythm in a band...

scales = this is where you will start to build up everything to
become a good soloist or lead guitarist...

other chords = barre chords, minor chords and others

1. your equipment but the BIG factor is your amp

2. there are many ways... changing your amp, changing your guitar and others...

Whammy bar = depends if you really want to have one and if you want to do some
weird things (IE Dimebag squeal or Steve Vai crazyness)

EDIT: MrCarrot got it...
#17
lesson 1:
Toon Guiter Down As Much As Posable.

Lesson 2:

Plam Mutez Top Free Stringz

lesson 3:
Jump Around

Lesson 4:

???

lesson 5:
Profitz!!!
Quote by roast
Cool, thanks Lagrance.


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