#2
You took the protective film off first right?
It could be from heat exposure if your leaving it near something hot.
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#3
Yeah I did. I was using a desk lamp so I could see better, could that be the cause?
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#4
Omg what a coincidence (spelling)
I painted a strat pickguard a few weeks ago with the EXACT same colour .
Thought i didnt mess it up.
#5
Quote by Evil_Magician
Thought i didnt mess it up.


I'll save it
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#6
What kind of paint did you use?Because it looks like it's not adhering right,you should try plasticote or vinyl dye
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#8
you could have also sprayed too much paint at once.
edit: i used krylon fusion on a pickguard and it never happened to me.
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#10
did you sand it down good and prime it first or did you just spay on the paint?
#11
did you sand it down good and prime it first or did you just spay on the paint?


Exactly what i was about to ask.

Because if you didnt sand it smoothly ,the paint couldnt stick to the surface and started to flake after drying.
#12
probably either ya didnt rough it up enough during prep or their might have been some kind of contaminent in that spot that caused the paint to rise like that.
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#13
Forgive a noob for just hopping in and answering this without properly introducing myself first, but I have seen this many times before, having painted cars, motorcycles, snowmobiles, etc. It is caused by spraying the paint too heavily, particularly the first coat. The solvents required to make the paint sprayable react with the plastic (or any undercoat that isn't 100% chemically compatible) and cause the wrinkling.

As for roughing the surface first: Careful. Modern paints are a chemical, not mechanical bond. All you need to do is knock off the gloss surface and clean thoroughly to get rid of any release agents still on the surface if painting a moulded plastic part. Very fine sandpaper (600grit) is more than adequate. Spray the first "fog" coat very thin, and allow it to dry. Subsequent coats get slightly thicker and will bond properly only if each coat is allowed the proper drying time. If allowed to dry for more than 48hrs between coats, a slight scuffing will be necessary to allow more coats to bond properly.

Build colour over 3 or 4 coats and have patience.
#14
the same problem happened to me once. When i sanded the paint, it looked like a combination of a broken windshield and a honeycomb.
Ibanez RGT42DXFX with emg 81/85
Schecter C1-Classic
Vox AD30VT
Knock off P-Bass
#15
Quote by Vulcan
It is caused by spraying the paint too heavily, particularly the first coat. The solvents required to make the paint sprayable react with the plastic (or any undercoat that isn't 100% chemically compatible) and cause the wrinkling.

As for roughing the surface first: Careful. Modern paints are a chemical, not mechanical bond. All you need to do is knock off the gloss surface and clean thoroughly to get rid of any release agents still on the surface if painting a moulded plastic part. Very fine sandpaper (600grit) is more than adequate. Spray the first "fog" coat very thin, and allow it to dry. Subsequent coats get slightly thicker and will bond properly only if each coat is allowed the proper drying time. If allowed to dry for more than 48hrs between coats, a slight scuffing will be necessary to allow more coats to bond properly.

Build colour over 3 or 4 coats and have patience.

Excellent advice! Although I didn't use sandpaper at all. I misted the spray from 10" ... it initially looked like it was too light and it was, but the drying, and following coats ensured sufficient coverage. See my PG on my second build and the trem cover in the first build.

#16
The desk lamp did it. Sand it down, and redo it without a lamp. I've had the exact same issue.
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#17
holding the spray can too close to the pick gaurd...and also try useing primer on it first...then use high grain sandpaper and slightly take some of the primer of to make it smooth and repeat with the primer/sanding like 3 or four times andthen paint it....that should help
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#18
this reminds me of the time I tried to use a hair blowdryer to dry my guitar quicker....


o when I saw those bubbles I nearly cried cause I had to sand it down like three times before and now I had to do it again...
I dont know if its the lamp or what that caused yours to do that, but I'd take everybodies advice so far.
...
#19
Yeah, I think it must have been a mix of a lot of those things. The lamp, spraying too close, putting on the paint too thick, not allowing drying time. Needless to say, I'm starting over
MG Free At Last
#20
Yeah, basically, you don't wanna get the paint to thick and then heat it too hot. Don't use a light to heat it up. A fan works ok to speed it up as it actually removes the moisture. Melting the paint just traps it in. And use multiple light coats.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.