#1
In this lesson on this site right here
click

right were it says

I suggest you make these chords with method 1 of positioning you fingers. Some common ways to play powerchords:

e|-----------3--3-------------3--3--------------6-----6----|
B|--------3--3--3-------------x--x--------6--6--6--6--6-6--|
G|--------x--x--0-----5-----5-5--5--5--5--5--5--3--3--3-3--|
D|-----5--5--5--0--5--5--5--5-5--5--3--3--3--3--3-------3--|
A|--5--5--5--5--x--3--3--3--3-3--3-----3--3----------------|
E|--3--3--3--3--3--3--3----------3-------------------------|
G5 C5 F5 Bb5


``````````````````````````

im trying to under stand what he means, because i thought a power chord was a root e note followed by 2 other ntoes 2 frest down 1 string below then another string below that.

but that shows up o 6 notes at the same time.... IM NEVER GONNA GET THIS
#3
Don't bump or doublepost.


A powerchord simply contains the root and fifth of a chord. An A5 chord simply contains A and E. You can have as many as you want.
#6
Quote by iwanaBarockstar
shut up faggot


relax, guy
i was just making a joke about his name
i haven't given my opinion on how you play, or how the OP plays for that matter
the internet is not a battlefield, and music is not a competition

#7
tryin to learn.... and no ones helping... im not saying its a competition im saying that im asking for advice.... not for you to come over here and ridicule me
#8
See the first shape? stick to that.

All the rest just add more depth but no more character. They are all powerchords i.e. they are all just the root and fifth, but in different octaves. Of course, those shapes are moveable (as there are no open strings) to play on different root notes.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
the question had already been answered.
A powerchord consists of only two tones; the root and the fifth.
However, these tones may occur several times in the chord.

Example: E5 consists of E (root) and B (fifth)
If you examine the following chord, you'll see that it contains only E and B, in other words its an E5 chord.

--0-------------------------------
--0-------------------------------
--9-------------------------------
--9-------------------------------
--7-------------------------------
--0-------------------------------

If you had an instrument that could play 5000 tones simultaneously, you could play 2781 Es and 2219 Bs, and it would still be an E5 chord.

Sorry if I came across as a dick, but this question really belongs in the beginners' forum doesn't it? And I still find it funny that you call yourself shredder guru.