#1
what scales would u recomend for soloing on the acoustic, (right now i just fool around with a pentatonic minor)
I got bats in belfry
I'm in the kitchen boiling society
I'm in the open catching all the leaves
We all sing what we want

please crit
eyes on the wall
#2
depends on the mood/sound of the solo. you can use any scale to solo on acoustic. it's what the style of music that determines what scale to use.
LSD

"Member #5 of UGPSA: Ultimate-Guitar's Pot Smokers Association. PM AK Guitarist to join."
#3
any scale. doesnt matter at all.
Dissonance is Bliss


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#4
Soloing on acoustic guitar is essentially the exact same as on electric.

However, it will not sound as good using the same techniques, and vice-versa. Acoustic guitars need open strings ringing, chords singing together. Honestly, if you want my opinion, look into Pete Townshend (The Who) and check out some of his improvisations and general acoustic techniques. He can make an acoustic sound as heavy as a les paul and more beautiful than any grand piano.

If you want to save yourself some time, be lazy, and not learn the theory necessary to be able to do Townshend's style well though, I suggest just getting comfortable with the electric on soloing and establish a good warm, clean tone or whatever would suit the song best. If you do insist soloing on acoustic though, the scales and all are the exact same (a guitar's a guitar after all), nothing really better on acoustic. Try to do more lower on the neck though (closer to the nut). It will ring out better, sustain longer, and sound a whole lot fuller on acoustic.
Quote by RHCP94
funkdaddyfresh is a real American
#5
sorry about the double post but i think i just realized something that could be helpful.

learn that same minor pentatonic scale...but move it closer to the nut. The notes would still be the same, just in a different pattern and different shape. Like take the notes in the scale and just play the same notes, but on frets closer to the nut (open, 1st thru 5th, etc).

o and heres a little clue. the minor pentatonic scale of one key has the same notes as the major pentatonic of another key. for instance, Em pentatonic and Gmaj pentatonic are both the same scale, but played with different root notes. (the formula for this is take whatever minor scale's root note---in this case E---, go up 3 frets---F, F#, G on the third fret---and that's the pentatonic major scale in that key. You play the same notes, same scale, same shape, they just now have different relationships to each other). This is really helpful because now you just doubled your scale knowledge. With each new scale you learn, you automatically can figure out the corresponding (or "relative") major or minor scale.

i hope i wasnt too confusing with how i worded all this

and if that last part confused you, forget it and just keep lookin up tabs.
Quote by RHCP94
funkdaddyfresh is a real American
#6
thanks for that and i get what ur saying about the shape and moving up throughout the fret board jsut changes the key of the solo
I got bats in belfry
I'm in the kitchen boiling society
I'm in the open catching all the leaves
We all sing what we want

please crit
eyes on the wall
#7
Quote by mfiore
thanks for that and i get what ur saying about the shape and moving up throughout the fret board jsut changes the key of the solo


kind of

when you move that first basic shape (the one we all learn at first and i assume ur talkin about), you change the key. There are different shapes of that same scale though. You can move the whole scale up and down the neck and stay in the same key. To do that though, you have to learn the other shapes.

http://guitarsecrets.com/a_minor_pentatonic_scale.htm
http://robinmay.co.uk/boxes.htm

These sites are a good place to start learning what I'm talking about.
Quote by RHCP94
funkdaddyfresh is a real American