#1
One thing I have always wanted to be able to do well was improvise but it has always been a chalenge for me. Whenever I try to solo over a song it sounds awful. Along with that I would like to be able to listen to a song and no how to play it and not always have to look up the tabs. Does anyone have any advise on what I can?
#2
master your fretboard, know the notes on every string and every fret. then know the key your playing in.

its that simple.
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#3
Yeah, you'll need to have a solid understanding of keys, non-harmonic tones, and chord analysis.
#4
learning scales and keys are essential. You really should get a teacher if you dont have one if you like improv.
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#6
if you can play a minor pentatonic scale and find the key of a song, then all you need to do is pick a good song and start making stuff up over it. if you're stuck then start with some old blues stuff....bb king, albert king, slow stuff. just imitate their licks till you get a feel for it.
#7
Quote by _RATM_
practice


OMG that was a constructive comment.

Learn scales so you can move all along your fretboard
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#8
btw you don't need oodles of theory and musical knowledge to improvise (although it does help). like i said, start with simple stuff, once you wear out the pentatonic scale you'll naturally look for other stuff to play and that'll lead into more theory.
#9
Thanks for all the help guys so have we come to the general general consensus that I should practice that minor petatonic more but how should I do that. Should I just play it over something I like and try and remember the licks I thought were good?
#10
pretty much, yeah. a lot of it comes from training your ear to what sounds good rather than memorizing licks. get a feel for the chord progression and which notes from the scale sound good over which chords in the song. eventually it'll come really naturally, don't feel foolish if you play something and land on a note that sounds bad because it might fit fine in another part of the song. just sit and jam for a while till it's comfortable.
Last edited by vantage4 at Feb 8, 2007,
#12
well if you know the chords to the song then it's easy. most songs have one minor chord in there somewhere. that's the key you play the pentatonic scale in. take all along the watchtower, and lets say it's being played with an a minor chord, g major chord and f major chord. so you would root the minor pentatonic scale on a.

but it's good to train yourself to recognize keys by ear too. pick a song you don't know and play a few notes until you find one that fits, and that's probably a note that's in the scale even if it's not the root.
#13
Quote by real_québécois
OMG that was a constructive comment.

Learn scales so you can move all along your fretboard



hey wtf..your sig. u didnt quote the same guy twice.

both names are different...

u just made both quotes up...how odd
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