#1
say is this thing an all tube amplifier? cause i'm reading the site at the moment and it says they got a solid state rectifier. what's with that? is it different or does it matter at all?
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#2
Rectifiers are used to chop the sound wave into a more "square" wave pattern (long story short, gives you gnarly distortion, see the Mesa Dual or Triple Recto). To do this you need a unit that responds quickly and harshly, and tubes suck at quick and harsh. Tubes react much slower than transistors when it comes to compression and limiting (which is a big part of what rectifiers do) and have a ton of headroom which would just be unnecessary in a rectifier as you're actually trying to squash your waveform.

This is one of those cases where solid state is your friend, the transistors won't be overdriven so you won't get the tinny, covered sound of an overdriven ss amp, they'll just be used to clip your sound into something a little hrder or meaner. So the amp is no doubt all tube (preamp/Power amp all tube driven) but the rectifier would be some high-end solid state stuff.
#3
allright that helped, a lot actually. so does it alter the tone at all or not.

edit: btw what amps have tube rectifiers then?, since it seems to be less practical if your not on huge gigs where your amp can roar on high volume.
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#4
Valve rectifiers tend to give more of a flabby sound (in the bass I think) but it's good for vintage sounds. Fender Bassmans have them, and other vintage amps.
That's just a generalisation though.
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#5
it's called sag. and i think some of the boogies still have tube rectification.
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#6
Quote by R_H_C_P
Valve rectifiers tend to give more of a flabby sound (in the bass I think) but it's good for vintage sounds. Fender Bassmans have them, and other vintage amps.
That's just a generalisation though.


^Half true, yes they are great for vintage sag, (this may seem like a paradox) but they are very good at chuggy, chunky distortion. I use tube recto's with my recto, although the bass is somewhat looser, the tone is much better. It's hard to describe, but I like it better. With cleans, I use solid state rectification to give me maximum headroom.

Another thing: Rectifiers aren't actually in your guitar signal path. They change AC to DC power (It may be DC->AC, I always mix up the two). With tube recto's, your rectifiers can't keep up with the demand for power asked for by your amp, so the front end of you guitar signal "Sags". Silicon diodes are very efficient and can keep up with your amps demand for power, thus no sag.
It's really preference, but I like my cleans w/ a solid state recto and my distortion channels with tube recto's. That's just me.

Good luck!

Quote by tubab0y
it's called sag. and i think some of the boogies still have tube rectification.

EDIT- actually, almost all boogie's have both tube AND silicon rectifiers (Except single recto and rect-o-verb I think)
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Last edited by zackprs at Feb 9, 2007,
#7
good to know, if the bass is looser i think i'd better have solid state rectifiers. since i play with my fingers(crossed over a while ago) the low tones can be a little too muddy and with loose bass i don't think it's gonna get any better. thanks again
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
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#8
Quote by Weybl Himself
Rectifiers are used to chop the sound wave into a more "square" wave pattern (long story short, gives you gnarly distortion, see the Mesa Dual or Triple Recto). To do this you need a unit that responds quickly and harshly, and tubes suck at quick and harsh. Tubes react much slower than transistors when it comes to compression and limiting (which is a big part of what rectifiers do) and have a ton of headroom which would just be unnecessary in a rectifier as you're actually trying to squash your waveform.

This is one of those cases where solid state is your friend, the transistors won't be overdriven so you won't get the tinny, covered sound of an overdriven ss amp, they'll just be used to clip your sound into something a little hrder or meaner. So the amp is no doubt all tube (preamp/Power amp all tube driven) but the rectifier would be some high-end solid state stuff.


What you are describing is just an SS amplifier, not rectifier. A rectifier can't be overdriven in the sense of a preamp or poweramp tube.

Your are right about the compression part, though.
#9
Quote by tubab0y
it's called sag. and i think some of the boogies still have tube rectification.


Most of the mesas are switchable between tube and diode driven rectification.
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#10
Quote by mr_hankey
What you are describing is just an SS amplifier, not rectifier. A rectifier can't be overdriven in the sense of a preamp or poweramp tube.

Your are right about the compression part, though.



The dangers are the same, if you put too much signal into anything you can overdrive it, and if transistors are invoved, it ain't good.