#1
i think i'm in a muscle-memory rut. I don't jam with anybody, but i every so often record my "stuff" with the intention of mixing samples together and creating my own music (for lack of a better term). i also am learning tabla (hindustani drumming) and when i become more proficient adding samples into the mix.
but back to my main issue. it seems like every time i pick up my guitar i just do variations on running scales, and compared to what i listen to (obviously i don't have other musicians with me), it all sounds so flat. i really think that muscle memory plays a big issue. and also not really being able to hear what i'm playing and being able to break thru to the next level. and i may be committing heresy in this forum, but i think its on a different plane than knowing theory (which i know a little bit of). but even that i can't really seem to encorporate beyond just playing the notes and modes and finger patterns.
i guess the stuff i'd like to create is sort of ambient psychadelic speed/death metal.
well, all this flies out the window when i'm on the
Last edited by sethp at Feb 9, 2007,
#2
^ you think it does.... thats a funny thing about smoking, i used to smoke a lot, like ALOT and thought it was a large part of my inspiration, it really wasn't, it just allowed me a different way to look at things. i'm neither condoning or condemning that, it just gives you a different point of view. now the first thing i can recommend is to stop running scales, that doesn't do you any good, learn some theory and figure out how the notes interact with each other. and also there are many different kinds of theory and different ways to look at music, so although you may think you're on a different plane (which getting supa-blowed you may mentally be) theoretically wise, if what you're playing sounds good, it can be explained and even if it doesn't sound good, it can still prolly be explained.
#3
try focusing more on the melody of your solos if they sound flat or dry. One good thing to try and do is to try and hum or just think of a melody that sounds cool to you, then try and play that. You can eventually then try and hum along with the solo your making on the spot. it'll help you be more original in soloing plus your solos will just sound better since i'm pretty sure you wouldn't just hum scales in your head.
#4
Quote by z4twenny
^ learn some theory and figure out how the notes interact with each other. and also there are many different kinds of theory and different ways to look at music, ... .


is there a good music theory for idiots book you might be able to recommend? or a cd, or dvd?
#5
Im stoned right now playing beatles songs on my acoustic, as for books I would just head to your local music store and ask for some theroy books, or just ask some one in your town.
www.myspace.com/thestalkingbutlers

Holy Knight of the Crusading Order of the Stratocaster.

Gear:
MIA Fender Stratocaster
MIA Fender Telecaster
MI? Fender TC-90

Fender Hot Rod Deville
Blackstar HT5, HT40

various pedals
#6
Quote by sethp
is there a good music theory for idiots book you might be able to recommend? or a cd, or dvd?


well there are actually 2 good starter books, the complete idiots guide to music theory and music theory for dummies. nothing terribly intensive mentally in either but it will help get you started and give you a decent foundation so that you can read more in depth theory books (i recommend college books for more in depth analysis) as for looking at music differently, thats independent of an individuals perspective. there are TONS of ways to look at it outside of the theory range. i have a very unique perspective on chromatics that i've never seen anyone else mention. the more rules you know, the more you'll begin to understand how to break those rules. remember, there is no spoon
#7
"there is no spoon" is that from the matrix?
is there anything like music-theory-as-applied-specifically-to-the-guitar?
#8
Yep, it's from the matrix.

And western music theory is applicable to just about all western instruments, so there wouldn't need to be one specifically for the guitar.

However, a guitar starter book might help you learn the basics of theory applied to the guitar. You already probably have the technique, but such a book could teach you note names and where they are found on the guitar, so you're better prepared to understand examples from a theory book.


Just to give my perspective on this, I like to spend about 30 minutes a day coming up with new licks that are not comfortable for me. If I just jam, I tend to go into what's comfortable. That used to be generic pentatonic phrases that were just copies of what Page and Clapton did, and it wasn't particularly interesting. By working on phrases that don't come as naturally, I can bring out ideas that aren't just straight scales.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out