#1
its just really hard for me i dont know why... i just can hear it right... any tips anything... especially when i have to do drop tunings its so hard without a tuner...
#2
It something that comes over time. Atleast it did with me :P
After playing about a year I could tune my guitar more or less by ear, without doing any sort special eartraining excercices.
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#3
it takes practice,

i always need a reference note, then i can tune from there by playing notes on the guitar and matching it with the next string. ITs quite easy, but you need to practice.
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#4
there is a certain way to listen for vibrations of the strings and make them stop
#6
Harmonic tuning?
You know when you do harmonics you only lightly touch the string, well if you know the E is in tune, harmonic ont he fifth fret (I know that's not how I should say it) and then on the A string on the seventh fret. You'll hear a sort of waving, the best I can put it. The faster the 'waving', the more out of tune it is. Keep tuning until it sounds the same.

I really can't explain it, and could be wrong, I usually use a tuner but can tune by ear if I have to. It's never perfect, but if you just keep practicing you'll get the hang of it.
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#7
Purely practise. which my jazz teacher has seem to forgotten asshole Everytime before you play try tuning it by ear then check with a tuner and see how close you were after time you will get closer and closer and then you will get good. I assume you were talking when all you strings are out of tune and you have no tuner kinda thing. (No relative tuning.( But if relative tuning is good. (having one string in tune and going from there) DInkyDaisy hit the nail on the head. But also The fifth fret is the same note as the string above. The seventh fret is the octave of the string below(not using harmonics.) But there are still vibrations you can here. Waves travelling through the air you'll hear it.
#8
I just play a few songs that use various different frets and strings and if they all sound right, then usually my tuning is correct.
#9
The way I hear things to be out of tune is that they sound like they're 'wobbling'. If the notes are quite a bit out of tune, the wobbling will be very fast. As you get closer to being in tune, the wobbling will slow down until there is no wobble, meaning you are in tune. Keep in mind that the wobbling can be very very slow, so you're in tune only when there is no wobbling at all.

I don't know if that helps, but that's how I hear it.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
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#10
However you tune whether it be via harmonics or via a 5th fret against open string, always a good idea to tune UP.

For two reasons:

a) reduces slippage of the string against the tuners
b) I personally find it easier to tune correctly when tuning up than tuning down.

btw... in case you don't already know about this. Very useful!

http://www.tunemybass.com/
#11
if my E is in tune...i just go to the 5th fret play that note...then play open A until they sound rite (play them by themselves..then wen it sounds kinda close..play them together..sort of like pinching the strings together rather than a strum)
and then continue that all the way down to G

cuz if u noticed....all the strings 5th fret is the open of the next string (except G..that is C# so i guess that would b the next note if u had a 6 string bass)


and that person wit the link....

i never knew that existed

that will come in handy..
Last edited by Crazy Horse at Feb 10, 2007,
#12
The "waving" and "wobbling" that has been spoken about is caused by two sine waves (the purest tone you can get) being different different (frequency = speed of oscilliatons per second). So, as one gets them more in tune (same frequency), they are the same speed and thus do not "wobble".

This is why tuning by harmonics is without a doubt the most accurate way of tuning your bass. None of the overtones are sounding, so you are basing your tuning on the purest sound available (the Sine wave).

If anyone was interested., that is.
#13
Quote by Applehead
The "waving" and "wobbling" that has been spoken about is caused by two sine waves (the purest tone you can get) being different different (frequency = speed of oscilliatons per second). So, as one gets them more in tune (same frequency), they are the same speed and thus do not "wobble".

This is why tuning by harmonics is without a doubt the most accurate way of tuning your bass. None of the overtones are sounding, so you are basing your tuning on the purest sound available (the Sine wave).

If anyone was interested., that is.



Thanks man, I've always been told that tuning by harmonics is more accurate, but never bothered wondering why.
#14
Quote by Applehead
This is why tuning by harmonics is without a doubt the most accurate way of tuning your bass. None of the overtones are sounding, so you are basing your tuning on the purest sound available (the Sine wave).


I have been wondering this for a while, Do harmonics not have overtones? Like when you play the open string and then touch the twelfth fret thats the overtone right? Except when I play the twelfth fret overtone and I then I touch at the seventh fret it plays the seventh fret overtone. Therefore wouldn't the twelfth fret overtone have overtones and therefore not be a sine wave? Because a sine wave is a wave with no overtones right? And then if it has an overtone it couldn't be a sine wave? Just a simple question.
#15
Quote by Applehead
The "waving" and "wobbling" that has been spoken about is caused by two sine waves (the purest tone you can get) being different different (frequency = speed of oscilliatons per second). So, as one gets them more in tune (same frequency), they are the same speed and thus do not "wobble".

This is why tuning by harmonics is without a doubt the most accurate way of tuning your bass. None of the overtones are sounding, so you are basing your tuning on the purest sound available (the Sine wave).

If anyone was interested., that is.


Very good explanation, Applehead. My old guitar teacher used to train his students to use an "e" tuning fork and then use harmonics to tune the rest of the strings.
#16
Aren't harmonics themselves overtones?
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#17
OK, it's like this..

When you play a note on your bass, a fretted note, what you hear is the Fundamental, and then overtones (harmonics). This combination of sine waves is heard as one sound, and that is what makes up the "timbre" of your instrument. In instruments like bass, guitar, cello etc, these overtones are at set intervals from the fundamental. Take for example a 440Hz sine wave. So, the first one will be at 880Hz, then at 1320Hz etc.. Combined, these make the note sound how you know it to sound. However, when you touch the string at a node point, it chokes off the fundamental so you just hear the harmonic. Depending on where you touch the string (at which node point), you get a different harmonic. Touching it in the middle, you get the first harmonic, which as you can see is a doubling of the frequency (commonly known as an octave). The correct term is not actually harmonics, thats too broad for me, but this is what they are commonly called so we shall continue to call them that. Opposite to harmonic is Inharmonic. This means that the values are not multiples of the fundamental, and so do not create "harmony" with the fundamental. Examples of this are bells and cymbals. The combined overtones do not create a recognisable pitch that we can call a note.
#18
ok i hav a question for you applehead, this has alluded me and my understanding of harmonics sucks rubber snails so i can't figure it out myself.

how would i tune to drop D usign harmonics? i've been using the open D string ot drop D and its not entirely accurate.
#19
Quote by SocKo?
ok i hav a question for you applehead, this has alluded me and my understanding of harmonics sucks rubber snails so i can't figure it out myself.

how would i tune to drop D usign harmonics? i've been using the open D string ot drop D and its not entirely accurate.

12th fret harmonic on the low E, open D string.

Just drop the E down till they match
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#21
Quote by FrenchyFungus
12th fret harmonic on the low E, open D string.

Just drop the E down till they match


Exactly.

Because the 12th fret of a D string, when played as a harmonic, is an octave higher than the Open string, thus making it the same as the open D string.
#22
Quote by SocKo?
ok i hav a question for you applehead, this has alluded me and my understanding of harmonics sucks rubber snails so i can't figure it out myself.

how would i tune to drop D usign harmonics? i've been using the open D string ot drop D and its not entirely accurate.

12 harmonic A string
7th E(or D) string

And applehead, what about the harmonic notes that are not octaves of the fret above it or of the root? Like all the notes in Portrait of Tracy by Jaco Pastorius?