#1
The time is coming for me to replace my guitar strings and I'm wondering which gauge to get

It's the 1st time I'm replacing strings since I got this guitar and I'm wondering what's a good all around string gauge to have?

I play some metal but then i also play some light stuff time to time like Franz Ferdinand or something like that.
#2
Yeah I play all of that. I have 10's on at the moment I think...
#3
9-10 tend to be a good standard. I use as a general rule 9 on Fender scale and 10 on Gibson scale guitars, but I'm a Blues/Rock player.

What guitar do you have? I wouldn't use 9's on a Gibson or shorter scale guitar...
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#4
I use and recommend 0.09s, not too light but very good to bend with and you can still get some very good speed as well.
#5
I like thicker strings. More tone to it, imo. I'm planning on getting 11's or 13's? Lol, I don't know, but I'm planning on trying the heavier gauges out.
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#6
im on 11's right now and i want thicker.
they sound better, im not a speed nut, and theres something neat about really needing to MEAN IT when you bend, because theyre so thick you cant just be superflous with bending.
i cant at least. plus if you play really hard you feel it like it was your First day when you ripped the crap out of your fingers.
'87 Fender Strat
Oscar Schmidt Archtop
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#7
I have an ESP LTD M-100FM with a double locking tremolo.

So with that maybe I'll go looking for 9's and 10's and then ask the sales people to get some more knowledge on it.
#8
if its never been strung before, you cant go wrong with a good set of 10s and then if you want thicker, go 11, if you want thinner, go 9, and go from there.

edit: okay after reading your post again, youre best off taking it to some sort of tech person, floyd bridges and locking systems are extremely tempermental compared to those of say, a Strat. the tech can show you how while he does it for you, with a guage that he helped you come to a conclusion on.
'87 Fender Strat
Oscar Schmidt Archtop
Laney LC15R
Last edited by boardsofcanada at Feb 11, 2007,
#9
The vast majority of guitars come with 9s, so that's probably what you had before. I'd recommend moving up to 10s unless you do a lot of shredding. Don't go any lighter than 9s.

EDIT: you'd probably want to know the difference between gauges. Lighter gauges are easier to play, while thicker gauges sound... better. They sound thicker and bigger than lighter gauges.
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Last edited by xifr at Feb 11, 2007,
#10
I think I might have a little try myself first, I saw some videos on Google video and i just saw that the guy just put in the strings by removing the string clamps.

I know about tightening and loosening the bridge to keep it parallel to the body.

would that be all i need to know?
#11
Quote by Esparko
I think I might have a little try myself first, I saw some videos on Google video and i just saw that the guy just put in the strings by removing the string clamps.

Stringing is tricky for beginners, as it's hard to demonstrate, let alone explain. What you need to do is push the string through the hole all the way, then take about an inch and push it back out so you have a little slack (1). Then you kink the loose end at the post (there's a proper way of doing this, but stick with basics for now)(2), and then wind it up. As you wind it, hold the string tight, and use a finger to push down behind the nut so that the winds go under eachother(5), resulting in a nice kinda winding.

Here's a visual tutorial:
http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/stringing.htm
The steps I said you can skip are 3 and 4, work on them after you've mastered 1, 2 and 5.

I know about tightening and loosening the bridge to keep it parallel to the body.

would that be all i need to know?

You mean tightening and loosening the tremolo springs at the back?
"A wise man once said, never discuss philosophy or politics in a disco environment." - Frank Zappa
Quote by Jinskee
Don't question the X.
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#12
Yeah, just incase the strings I get are thicker.

But thanks for the site, it's just that I don't really trust the technicians here, I had a bad experience with a sales rep, the store built their own guitars which were basically knock offs of Fender and Gibson, etc.
I was asking about modifying my guitar to incorporate a toggle switch in the lower horn to switch through the pickups, and he's like what?
they build their own guitars for christ sake..

I went to london on vacation and asked about it in the same manner I did with the local tech i had and the London guy understood right away...

But oh well, I might aswell give them another try, I just hope they don't screw it up..
It was hard to acquire that thing while living in the Philippines..
#13
well you can also try light top/medium bottom strings like d'addario's ESXL125.it has the light .09 .11 .16 light for shredding then the .26 .36 .46 for heavier toned power chords.

by the way,the store in the philippines,what is it called? RJ music store?
#14
Yeah, that's it, RJ Guitars. Do you know if they're actually good?

Or did I just get a bad sales rep.